TV Character Evaluation: Gordon Gekko

1. Introduction

The aim of this paper is to provide a TV character evaluation based on different personality theories. The methods used to assess the personality traits of the characters will be based on the Big Five personality theory, which includes neuroticism, agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, and openness to experience. The paper will also consider the work of Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud to provide a more in-depth understanding of the characters' personalities. Furthermore, the paper will use Michael Douglas's charactization of Gordon Gekko in the film Wall Street and Arnold Schwarzenegger's charactization of the Terminator to provide examples of how these theories can be applied to real-life people.

2. TV Character Evaluation: Personality Theories

The first step in conducting a TV character evaluation is to choose a show or movie that will be used as the basis for the analysis. For the purposes of this paper, the film Wall Street (1987) will be used. The second step is to choose a character from the chosen film that will be assessed using the different personality theories. In this paper, Gordon Gekko (played by Michael Douglas) will be used as the character for analysis. The third step is to watch the film and take notes on the different behaviors and characteristics exhibited by the character. After taking notes, the fourth step is to begin assessing the character using the different personality theories.

3. Theoretical perspective of the type A personality

The type A personality is characterized by ambition, competitiveness, and a strong desire for success. Individuals who have a type A personality are usually very achievement-oriented and are always looking for ways to improve their performance. They are also usually very impatient and have a low tolerance for failure. Type A personalities are often associated with high levels of stress and anxiety. In general, type A personalities are considered to be high-achieving and driven individuals who are always looking for ways to improve their performance.

When applying the type A personality theory to Gordon Gekko, it is evident that he possesses many of the traits associated with this personality type. Throughout the film, Gekko is constantly striving for more money and more power. He is also very impatient and has a low tolerance for failure. For example, when his protégé Bud Fox (played by Charlie Sheen) makes a mistake, Gekko immediately berates him and tells him that he is "fired". Gekko is also very achievement-oriented and always looks for ways to increase his wealth. For instance, when Gekko learns that Fox has insider information about Bluestar Airlines, he immediately begins making plans on how he can use this information to make more money. Overall, Gekko exhibits many of the traits associated with the type A personality type.

4. Theoretical perspective of the type B personality

The type B personality is characterized by a laid-back attitude and a lack of ambition or competitiveness. Individuals who have a type B personality are usually content with what they have and do not feel the need to constantly strive for more. They are also usually patient and have a high tolerance for failure. Type B personalities are often associated with being easy-going and relaxed individuals who do not get easily stressed or anxious. In general, type B personalities are considered to be relaxed and easy-going individuals who do not feel the need to constantly strive for more.

When applying the type B personality theory to Gordon Gekko, it is evident that he does not possess any of the traits associated with this personality type. Throughout the film, Gekko is constantly striving for more money and more power. He is also very impatient and has a low tolerance for failure. For example, when his protégé Bud Fox (played by Charlie Sheen) makes a mistake, Gekko immediately berates him and tells him that he is "fired". Gekko is also very achievement-oriented and always looks for ways to increase his wealth. For instance, when Gekko learns that Fox has insider information about Bluestar Airlines, he immediately begins making plans on how he can use this information to make more money. Overall, Gekko does not exhibit any of the traits associated with the type B personality type.

5. Theoretical perspective of the type C personality

The type C personality is characterized by a lack of emotion and a lack of concern for others. Individuals who have a type C personality are usually very introverted and prefer to be alone. They are also usually very unemotional and do not get easily stressed or anxious. Type C personalities are often associated with being cold, calculating, and manipulative individuals who do not care about anyone but themselves. In general, type C personalities are considered to be selfish and self-centered individuals who only care about their own needs and wants.

When applying the type C personality theory to Gordon Gekko, it is evident that he possesses many of the traits associated with this personality type. Throughout the film, Gekko is shown to be a very introverted individual who prefers to be alone. He is also very unemotional and does not seem to care about anyone but himself. For instance, when Gekko learns that his protégé Bud Fox (played by Charlie Sheen) is in trouble, he immediately begins making plans on how he can use this situation to his advantage. Gekko is also very cold and calculating in his actions. For example, when Gekko attempts to takeover Bluestar Airlines, he ruthlessly fires all of the employees in order to save money. Overall, Gekko exhibits many of the traits associated with the type C personality type.

6. Conclusion

In conclusion, Gordon Gekko exhibits many traits that are associated with the type A, type C, and type B personalities. He is constantly striving for more money and power, which are both associated with the type A personality. He is also very introverted and unemotional, which are both associated with the type C personality. Furthermore, Gekko does not seem to care about anyone but himself, which is another trait associated with the type C personality.

FAQ

The TV character's personality compares to real-life people in that they are both complex and unique. The TV character's personality is also similar to real-life people in that it is constantly changing and evolving based on the character's experiences and interactions with others.

Some of the psychological theories that best explain the TV character's personality include Psychodynamic Theory, Social Cognitive Theory, and Personality Psychology. These theories help to explain how the character's past experiences, thoughts, and emotions impact his/her current behavior and personality.

The TV character's personality is dynamic because it is constantly changing based on the character's experiences and interactions with others.

Other characters on the show react to the TV character's personality in a variety of ways depending on their own personalities and relationship with the TV character. In some cases, other characters may be drawn to the TV character because of his/her magnetic persona while in other cases, other characters may be put off by the TV character's brashness or arrogance.

TheTV character does not have any disorders or maladaptive behaviors that are overtly apparent; however, it is possible that he/she suffers from some form of mental illness or has some hidden issues that have not yet been addressed on the show.

There are several positive aspects to the TV character's personality including his/her intelligence, wit, charm, and loyalty. These qualities benefit him/her in life by helping him/her to succeed professionally and develop strong relationships with others.

I would want to be friends with this person in real life because he/she is an interesting and complex individual who I feel like I could learn a lot from.