The Use of Irony, Imagery, and Symbolism in Frost’s “Unharvested” and Bishop’s “The Fish”

1. Introduction: The Use of Irony, Imagery, and Symbolism in Frost’s “Unharvested” and Bishop’s “The Fish”

In this essay, I will be contrasting and comparing the use of irony, imagery, and symbolism in Frost’s poem “Unharvested” and Bishop’s poem “The Fish.” By looking at these elements in each poem, we can gain a greater appreciation for the poems.

2. Irony in “Unharvested”

There is irony in Frost’s poem “Unharvested.” The title of the poem suggests that the speaker is talking about an apple that was not harvested. This is ironic because, as the speaker says in the poem, the apple was not harvested because it was not ripe yet. If the apple had been harvested, it would have been unripe and not as good. The speaker is saying that it is better to wait for the apple to be ripe before harvesting it.

3. Imagery in “Unharvested”

There is also imagery in Frost’s poem. The speaker describes the apple as being “red all over / A solid red ground.” This creates a image of a ripe apple that is ready to be harvested. The speaker also talks about the smell of the apple, which creates an image of a sweet-smelling apple.

4. Symbolism in “Unharvested”

In addition to irony and imagery, there is also symbolism in Frost’s poem. The apple symbolizes something that is not ready to be taken or used. The fact that the apple was not harvested suggests that there is something else that is not ready to be taken or used. This could be interpreted as a symbol for something else that is not ready to be taken or used in life.

5. Irony in “The Fish”

There is also irony in Bishop’s poem “The Fish.” The title of the poem suggests that the speaker is talking about a fish that was caught by a fisherman. However, as the speaker says in the poem, the fish was not really caught by the fisherman. The fish was caught by another fish that was swimming behind the fisherman. This is ironic because it shows that sometimes things are not what they seem to be. Just because something appears to be one thing does not mean that it actually is that thing.

6. Imagery in “The Fish”

There is also imagery in Bishop’s poem. The speaker talks about how the fish looked when it was caught by the other fish: “His scales were wet and he smelled ofGet an essay on « Symbolismon| Irony| Imagery| Apples » At PaperHelpOrg – 1000 word essay on paperhelp */
Thesis: The use of irony, imagery, and symbolism in Frost’s “Unharvested” and Bishop’s “The Fish” creates a greater appreciation for the poems.

Body Paragraph 1:

There is irony in Frost’s poem “Unharvested.” The title of the poem suggests that the speaker is talking about an apple that was not harvested. This is ironic because, as the speaker says in the poem, the apple was not harvested because it was not ripe yet. If the apple had been harvested, it would have been unripe and not as good. The speaker is saying that it is better to wait for the apple to be ripe before harvesting it.

This irony is used to create a greater appreciation for the poem. It shows that sometimes things are not what they seem to be. Just because something appears to be one thing does not mean that it actually is that thing.

Body Paragraph 2:

There is also imagery in Frost’s poem. The speaker describes the apple as being “red all over / A solid red ground.” This creates a image of a ripe apple that is ready to be harvested. The speaker also talks about the smell of the apple, which creates an image of a sweet-smelling apple.

This imagery is used to create a greater appreciation for the poem. It allows the reader to visualize the scene that the speaker is describing.

Body Paragraph 3:

In addition to irony and imagery, there is also symbolism in Frost’s poem. The apple symbolizes something that is not ready to be taken or used. The fact that the apple was not harvested suggests that there is something else that is not ready to be taken or used. This could be interpreted as a symbol for something else that is not ready to be taken or used in life.

This symbolism is used to create a greater appreciation for the poem. It shows that the poet is using the apple to represent something else. This allows the reader to think about what else the apple might represent.
Conclusion:

The use of irony, imagery, and symbolism in Frost’s “Unharvested” and Bishop’s “The Fish” creates a greater appreciation for the poems. These elements are used to create a deeper meaning for the poems. They also allow the reader to visualize the scenes that the poet is describing.

FAQ

The unharvested wheat in Frost's poem symbolizes the speaker's regret at not having had the opportunity to harvest the wheat before it was lost.

The fish in Bishop's poem symbolizes the speaker's feeling of being out of place and disconnected from her surroundings.

Both poems use nature to explore themes of loss and change, but Frost's poem does so in a more positive light, while Bishop's poem uses nature to explore more negative themes.

The poets' attitudes towards their subjects differ in that Frost is more positive and hopeful, while Bishop is more negative and pessimistic.