The Unique Features of New Zealand English

1. Introduction

New Zealand English is a variety of English that is spoken in New Zealand. It is similar to Australian English, but there are some differences between the two varieties. New Zealand English has a number of features that are not found in other varieties of English. One of these features is the way that it uses vocabulary from the environment.

2. Typical features of New Zealand English vocabulary

2.1 Environmental borrowings from Maori

One of the most striking features of New Zealand English is the way that it has borrowed words from the Maori language. These words relate to the environment and the natural world. Some examples of these borrowings include:

– kauri: a type of tree
– kiwi: a flightless bird
– rakau: a tree or bush
– moa: a large, extinct bird
– tuatara: a lizard-like reptile
– tui: a type of bird
– pukeko: a swamp bird
– kea: a mountain parrot

These words have been borrowed into New Zealand English and they are used in everyday speech. They are often used to refer to specific places or things in the environment. For example, the word kauri is used to refer to a type of tree that is found in New Zealand. The word moa is used to refer to an extinct bird that was once found in New Zealand.

2. 2 Other environmental borrowings

In addition to environmental borrowings from Maori, New Zealand English has also borrowed words from other languages. These borrowings usually relate to specific parts of the environment. For example, the word Kaipara comes from the Maori language and it refers to a specific area of New Zealand. The word witi comes from the Polynesian language and it refers to a type of tree that is found in New Zealand. The word puriri comes from the Tahitian language and it refers to another type of tree that is found in New Zealand.

3. Major differences between New Zealand English and other regional varieties of English

3. 1 Australian English

There are some major differences between Australian English and New Zealand English. One of these differences is in the way that words are pronounced. Australian English tends to be more nasal than New Zealand English. This difference is due to the fact that Australia is located further away from England than New Zealand is. This means that there has been less influence from England on Australian English than there has been on New Zealand English.
Another difference between Australian English and New Zealand English is in the way that words are spelt. Words in Australian English are often spelt differently to words in New Zealand English. For example, the word colour is spelt as color in American English, but it is spelt as colour in British English and CanadianEnglish. However, in Australian English and New Zealand English, the word is spelt as colour. This difference is due to the fact that Australian English has been influenced by American spelling conventions, while New Zealand English has been influenced by British spelling conventions.
A third difference between Australian English and New Zealand English is in grammar. Grammatical structures that are considered standard in BritishEnglish are often considered non-standard in Australian English. For example, the use of the present perfect tense is considered non-standard in Australian English. This is because the present perfect tense is not used in spoken Australian English.

3. 2 New Zealand English

New Zealand English has a number of features that are not found in other varieties of English. One of these features is the way that words are pronounced. New Zealand English has a number of unique vowel sounds that are not found in other varieties of English. For example, the vowel sound in the word bird is different in New Zealand English than it is in British English. This difference is due to the fact that New Zealand English has been influenced by Maori and Polynesian languages.
Another feature of New Zealand English is the way that words are spelt. Words in New Zealand English are often spelt differently to words in British English. For example, the word colour is spelt as color in American English, but it is spelt as colour in British English and Canadian English. However, in New Zealand English, the word is spelt as colour. This difference is due to the fact that New Zealand English has been influenced by British spelling conventions.
A third feature of New Zealand English is in grammar. Grammatical structures that are considered standard in British English are often considered non-standard in New Zealand English. For example, the use of the present perfect tense is considered non-standard in New Zealand English. This is because the present perfect tense is not used in spoken New Zealand English.

4. Conclusion

New Zealand English is a variety of English that has a number of unique features. One of these features is the way that it uses vocabulary from the environment. New Zealand English has borrowed words from the Maori language and from other languages to create a distinctive vocabulary for talking about the environment.

FAQ

New Zealand English is characterized by its vowel shifts, simplified grammar, and distinctive vocabulary.

The environment has influenced the development of New Zealand English in several ways, including the isolation of New Zealand from other English-speaking countries and the influence of Maori and Polynesian languages.

Some of the unique words and phrases used in New Zealand English include "cuzzie" (friend), "chilly bin" (cooler), and "gobsmacked" (surprised).

New Zealand English is different from other varieties of English in several ways, including its pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary.