The Triangular Slave Trade

1. The first private slave trader

The first private slave trader was John Hawkins. He left England with 100 men and 3 ships, his first point was Sierra Leone where he captured 300 slaves and sold them in Hispaniola.

2. The Royal African Company

The English slave trade began when the English government granted a monopoly to the Royal African Company in 1660. The company was given the exclusive right to transport slaves from Africa to the English colonies in America.

3. The English slave trade in 1660

The English slave trade began in earnest in 1660 when the first shipment of slaves arrived in the English colony of Barbados. The slaves were brought from the West African country of Guinea and were sold to planters on the island.

4. The English slave trade in 1698

The English slave trade reached its peak in 1698 when more than 30,000 slaves were transported from Africa to the English colonies in America. However, the trade began to collapse soon afterwards due to a number of factors, including competition from other European countries and resistance from African rulers.

5. The Company of Merchants Trading to Africa

In 1752, the English government abolished the monopoly of the Royal African Company and replaced it with the Company of Merchants Trading to Africa. This new company was given the exclusive right to transport slaves from Africa to the English colonies in America.

6. The English slave trade in 1752

The English slave trade reached its peak in 1752 when more than 50,000 slaves were transported from Africa to the English colonies in America. However, the trade began to decline soon afterwards due to a number of factors, including competition from other European countries and resistance from African rulers.

7. The Atlantic slave trade

The Atlantic slave trade was the largest slave trade in history and it had a profound impact on both Africa and America. Slaves were transported from Africa to America by ship and they were often crammed into cramped conditions below deck. Many of them died during the voyage due to disease or violence.
Upon arrival in America, slaves were sold at auction and they were often put to work on plantations or in mines and factories. They were typically given very little food and they were subject to brutal treatment by their owners.
Slave rebellions were relatively rare but they did occur on occasion, such as the famous rebellion led by Nat Turner in 1831. In 1865, the American Civil War finally ended slavery but it would take many years before blacks achieved full equality in America. 8. The triangular slave trade
The triangularslavetrade is a term used forthe atlanticslavetradein whichships carriedslavesfromAfrica toportsin theWest Indieswherethey weresold formolasses,sugarandother plantationproducts whichwere thenshipped backto Europe.- See more at: https://www.essaytyper.com/essay-on-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-history/#sthash.d7FcU6wv.dpuf

FAQ

The trans-atlantic slave trade began in the 15th century when Portuguese explorers brought African slaves to work on sugar plantations in Brazil.

The motivations behind the slave trade were economic; plantation owners needed cheap labor to produce crops like sugar and tobacco.

Life for slaves during this time period was incredibly difficult; they were forced to work long hours in harsh conditions with little food or rest. Many slaves died from exhaustion or disease.