The Third and Final Continent and Mrs. Sen’s: A Comparison of Two Stories about Separation

1. Introduction

The Third and Final Continent and Mrs. Sen’s by L. Jhumpa are different in context but very similar in theme. The issue of separation is a common theme in the two stories. In “The Third and Final Continent”, the protagonist is separated from his homeland and has to start a new life in America. In “Mrs. Sen’s”, the protagonist is separated from her family and has to start a new life in America. Both protagonists have to face the challenges of living in a new country, and both storytellers use their experiences to explore the theme of separation.

2. “The Third and Final Continent”

“The Third and Final Continent” is a story about an Indian man who comes to America to study at Harvard University. He is separated from his homeland, and he has to start a new life in America. The story is narrated by the protagonist, and it is told in first person point of view. The story is set in the late 19th century, and it chronicles the protagonist’s experiences as he adjusts to life in America.

The protagonist is initially homesick, and he feels like a fish out of water. He is not used to the cold weather, and he does not know anybody in America. He misses his family, and he feels like an outsider in his new country. However, he eventually adjusts to life in America, and he starts to feel at home. He makes friends, and he finds a job. He also meets a woman named Meena, and they get married. The protagonist’s experiences show that it is possible to overcome the challenges of living in a new country.

3. “Mrs. Sen’s”

“Mrs Sen’s” is a story about an Indian woman who comes to America to work as a nanny for an American family. She is separated from her family, and she has to start a new life in America. The story is narrated by the protagonist, and it is told in first person point of view. The story is set in the present day, and it chronicles the protagonist’s experiences as she adjusts to life in America.

The protagonist is initially homesick, and she feels like a fish out of water. She is not used to the cold weather, and she does not know anybody in America. She misses her family, and she feels like an outsider in her new country. However, she eventually adjusts to life in America, and she starts to feel at home. She makes friends, and she finds a job. She also meets a man named Elliot, and they start dating. The protagonist’s experiences show that it is possible to overcome the challenges of living in a new country.

4. Conclusion

“The Third and Final Continent” and “Mrs. Sen’s” are two stories that explore the theme of separation. The protagonists in both stories are separated from their homeland, and they have to start a new life in America. Both protagonists have to face the challenges of living in a new country, but they both show that it is possible to overcome these challenges.

FAQ

The two stories from "Interpreter of Maladies" by Jhumpa that focus on separation are "A Temporary Matter" and "When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine."

In "A Temporary Matter," the characters experience separation due to a temporary power outage that forces them to confront the sadness and loneliness in their marriage. In "When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine," the character experiences separation from her homeland and culture as she adjusts to life in America after her family moves there from Bangladesh.

Jhumpa uses different literary devices to explore the theme of separation in each story. In "A Temporary Matter," she uses symbolism to represent the way that the couple's relationship is slowly breaking down. In "When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine," she uses juxtaposition to contrast the character's experience of living in two different cultures.

Some commonalities between the two stories about separation include the themes of loneliness, loss, and adjustment.

Each story offers a unique perspective on this universal human experience by focusing on a different type of separation: physical in "A Temporary Matter" and emotional/cultural in "When Mr.. Pirzada Came to Dine."

These stories offer insight into how to deal with our own separations by showing us that they are a part of life and that we can learn from them.