The Problem of Violence Against Foreigners in West Europe

1. Introduction: violence against foreigners in West Europe

In the past few decades, foreigners living in Western European countries have often found themselves on the receiving end when it comes to integration into host cultures. This is particularly true for those who come from non-Western cultures and who do not conform to the dominant norms and values of Western societies.

One of the most visible manifestations of this problem is the violence that has been directed against foreigners in many parts of West Europe. This violence has taken a variety of forms, from physical attacks and assaults to more indirect forms of hostility such as discrimination in housing and employment.

The problem of violence against foreigners is not new, but it has become more widespread and systematic in recent years. This is partly due to the fact that there has been a significant increase in the number of refugees and other immigrants coming to West European countries in recent years.

However, it is also important to note that the violence against foreigners is not just a problem for refugee communities. It is also a problem for other minorities living in West European countries, such as ethnic minorities and homosexuals.

2. The 1990s: a decade of violence against refugees

The 1990s was a decade of violence against refugees in many parts of West Europe. This was particularly true in Germany, where there was a series of racist attacks against asylum seekers in the early 1990s.

These attacks peaked in 1992, when a group of neo-Nazis firebombed an asylum seeker hostel in Mölln, killing three people and injuring dozens more. This attack was followed by another firebombing of an asylum seeker hostel in Rostock-Lichtenhagen, which killed two people and injured dozens more.

The violence against asylum seekers culminated in the murder of a Turkish woman named Hatun Surucu by a group of neo-Nazis in Berlin in 2005. This murder sparked widespread public outcry and led to a crackdown on neo-Nazi groups in Germany. However, the problem of violence against foreigners has not been completely eradicated, and there have been sporadic outbreaks of racist violence in recent years.

3. The Brixton and Birmingham riots of the early 1990s

The Brixton riot was a week-long period of unrest that took place in April 1981 in the London borough of Lambeth. The riot began after police conducted a raid on a house where they believed cannabis was being grown. This led to clashes between police and local residents, which quickly escalated into full-scale rioting.

More than 300 police officers were injured during the rioting, and more than 200 people were arrested. The cost of damage caused by the rioting was estimated at £7 million (equivalent to £26 million today). The Brixton riot was one of the most serious outbreaks of civil unrest in Britain during the 20th century.

The Birmingham riot was a period of unrest that took place in September 1985 in the Handsworth area of Birmingham, England. The riot began after police attempted to stop a car for speeding and ended up being dragged along by the vehicle for several hundred yards. This led to angry confrontations between police and local residents, which quickly escalated into full-scale rioting. More than 100 police officers were injured during the rioting, and more than 200 people were arrested.

The cost of damage caused by the rioting was estimated at £9 million (equivalent to £24 million today). The Birmingham riot was one of the most serious outbreaks of civil unrest in Britain during the 20th century.

4. The East and West regions of Germany in the 1990s

In the early 1990s, Germany was divided into two separate regions: the East and the West. The East region consisted of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), while the West region consisted of the former Federal Republic of Germany (FRG).

The two regions had different economic systems, with the East region being a communist state and the West region being a capitalist state. This led to a great deal of tension between the two regions, which was exacerbated by the fact that many people from the East region moved to the West region in search of better economic opportunities.

The tension between the two regions came to a head in 1992, when a group of neo-Nazis firebombed an asylum seeker hostel in Mölln, killing three people and injuring dozens more. This attack sparked nationwide protests against racism, which eventually led to the unification of Germany in October 1990.

5. Homosexuality in Turkey and the torture of gays

Turkey is a predominantly Muslim country, and homosexuality is not widely accepted. In recent years, there have been several reports of violence against gays in Turkey. In one case, a gay man was tortured to death by police after he was arrested for public kissing. In another case, a group of men were brutally beaten by a mob after they were caught having sex in a public park.

There have also been several reports of gay men being attacked by family members or others who disapproved of their homosexuality. In one case, a gay man was killed by his father after he came out to him. In another case, a gay man was attacked by his brother after he refused to stop seeing his boyfriend.

There is no law against homosexuality in Turkey, but discrimination and violence against gays is widespread. This has led to many gays living in fear for their safety.

6. Stone throwing and firebombing in France

In October 2005, there was a series of riots in Paris and other French cities following the deaths of two teenagers who were electrocuted while hiding from police in an electricity substation. The riots began as a protest against police brutality but quickly escalated into full-scale violence, with youths burning cars and throwing stones at police officers. More than 3,000 cars were burned and more than 1,000 people were arrested during the course of the riots.

The riots caused widespread damage to property and businesses in disadvantaged neighbourhoods. This led to accusations that the government was deliberately targeting these neighbourhoods with its policies. The riots also created tensions between France’s Muslim community and the wider population.

7. Political and ideological differences in Western European countries

There are significant political and ideological differences between Western European countries on a number of issues relating to foreigners and immigration. For example, there is debate about whether or not Western European countries should allow refugees to enter their territory. There is also debate about whether or not Western European countries should provide financial assistance to refugees or whether this should be done by international organizations such as the United Nations.

There is also debate about the integration of foreigners into Western European societies. Some people argue that foreigners should be allowed to maintain their own culture and traditions, while others argue that they should be expected to integrate into the dominant culture.

8. Conclusion: the exclusion of Turks from German society

The problem of violence against foreigners is a significant one in many parts of West Europe. This violence often takes the form of physical attacks and assaults, but it can also take more indirect forms such as discrimination in housing and employment.

The problem of violence against foreigners is particularly acute in Germany, where there has been a long history of exclusion and discrimination against Turks. This exclusion has been formalized through laws such as the German national identity law, which effectively bars Turks from becoming full members of German society.

The problem of violence against foreigners is not just a problem for refugee communities. It is also a problem for other minorities living in West European countries, such as ethnic minorities and homosexuals.

The exclusion of foreigners from full participation in Western European societies is a major problem that needs to be addressed. It is important to remember that most foreigners come to West European countries in search of a better life and that they should be given the opportunity to integrate into their new societies.

FAQ

The experiences of foreigners in West Europe have changed over time due to a variety of factors. These include economic, political, and social changes within the region, as well as increasing international migration.

Some of the key factors that have contributed to these changes include globalization, the rise of multiculturalism, and increasing diversity within West European societies.

Foreigners in West Europe generally enjoy greater social and economic opportunities than other groups within society. However, they also face some challenges, such as discrimination and exclusion from certain aspects of public life.

The challenges faced by foreigners in West European societies today vary depending on the country and specific situation. However, some common issues include racism, xenophobia, and lack of integration into mainstream society.