The nurse-patient relationship when working with communication and cultural considerations

1. Introduction

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nurse-patient relationship when working with communication and cultural considerations. In order to explore this, the paper will first consider the factors which can influence the development of a nurse-patient relationship when working with communication and cultural considerations. The paper will then go on to examine how these factors can impact upon the quality of care received by Aboriginal patients.

2. Communication and cultural considerations

There are a number of factors which can influence the development of a nurse-patient relationship when working with communication and cultural considerations. These include:

2. 1. Aboriginal woman and end stage kidney disease

Aboriginal women are more likely than other women to develop end stage kidney disease (ESKD) (Fenwick, Ogilvie, et al, 2010). This is due to a number of factors, including: poor access to healthcare, higher rates of diabetes and hypertension, and lower levels of education (Fenwick, Ogilvie, et al, 2010). As a result of this, Aboriginal women are more likely to require dialysis than other women (Fenwick, Ogilvie, et al, 2010).

2. 2. Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis

Aboriginal women who require dialysis are more likely to receive haemodialysis than peritoneal dialysis (Fenwick, Ogilvie, et al, 2010). This is due to a number of factors, including: poorer access to healthcare, lower levels of education, and higher rates of diabetes and hypertension (Fenwick, Ogilvie, et al, 2010). As a result of this, Aboriginal women are more likely to experience poorer outcomes from dialysis than other women (Fenwick, Ogilvie, et al).

2. 3. Community context

Aboriginal women who require dialysis often live in remote communities (Fenwick, Ogilvie, et al). This can impact upon their access to healthcare and their ability to comply with treatment regimes (Fenwick, Ogilvie, et al). As a result of this, Aboriginal women are more likely to experience poorer outcomes from dialysis than other women (Fenwick, Ogilvie 2010).

3. Nurse-patient relationships
3.1. Nora Jones

Nora Jones is an Aboriginal woman who has end stage kidney disease and requires haemodialysis (Fenwick & Ogilvie 2010). Nora lives in a remote community and has poor access to healthcare (Fenwick & Ogilvie 2010). As a result of this, Nora has experienced a number of difficulties with her treatment regime, including: missed appointments, non-compliance with medication regimes and difficulty accessing transportation to her appointments (Fenwick & Ogilvie 2010). Despite these difficulties Nora has maintained a good relationship with her nurse and has been able to comply with her treatment regime (Fenwick & Ogilvie 2010). This has resulted in Nora experiencing good outcomes from her haemodialysis treatment (Fenwick & Ogilvie 2010).

3. 2 Fenwick et al 2011 study

In order to examine how communication and cultural considerations can impact upon the nurse-patient relationship, Fenwick et al (2011) conducted a study with Aboriginal patients and white nurses. The study found that there were a number of differences in the way that Aboriginal patients and white nurses communicated with each other. These differences included:

– Aboriginal patients were more likely to use non-verbal communication than white nurses

– Aboriginal patients were more likely to use silence as a communication strategy than white nurses

– Aboriginal patients were more likely to use humour as a communication strategy than white nurses

– White nurses were more likely to use medical jargon when communicating with Aboriginal patients than Aboriginal patients were when communicating with white nurses.

The study also found that there were a number of differences in the way that Aboriginal patients and white nurses prioritised communication. These differences included:

– Aboriginal patients were more likely to prioritise personal information when communicating with white nurses than white nurses were when communicating with Aboriginal patients.

– White nurses were more likely to prioritise medical information when communicating with Aboriginal patients than Aboriginal patients were when communicating with white nurses.

4. Conclusion

The paper has examined the nurse-patient relationship when working with communication and cultural considerations. The paper has looked at how a number of factors can influence the development of a nurse-patient relationship when working with communication and cultural considerations. The paper has also looked at how these factors can impact upon the quality of care received by Aboriginal patients.

FAQ

The different types of communication between nurses and patients include verbal, nonverbal, and written communication.

Effective communication can be established between nurses and patients through the use of clear and concise language, maintaining eye contact, and using open-ended questions.

It is important for nurses to communicate effectively with their patients because it can help to promote healing and prevent misunderstandings.

Some common barriers to effective communication between nurses and patients include cultural differences, language barriers, and differing levels of health literacy.

These barriers can be overcome by using interpreters, developing patient education materials in multiple languages, and providing simple instructions in an easily understandable format.