The map in King Solomon’s Mines: a reflection of Victorian sexism and racism.

1. Introduction

King Solomon’s Mines is a novel by H. Rider Haggard, first published in 1885. The story is set in the Kingdom of Basutoland, now Lesotho, in southern Africa, and follows the adventures of a young man named Allan Quatermain.

The novel has been adapted for film several times, most notably in 1950, when it was made into a film starring Stewart Granger and Deborah Kerr.

The book is notable for its time because it portrays Africans in a positive light, as opposed to the typical colonial view of Africans as savages. It is also one of the first adventure stories to feature a treasure map.

2. The map in King Solomon’s Mines

One of the most important features of the novel is the map that Allan Quatermain and his companions use to find the lost city of Kukuanaland. The map is full of racist and sexist stereotypes.

For example, the tip of a mountain is described as a “nipple”, while the compass logo is referred to as a “breast”. The female body is used as a map, with various landmarks being compared to breasts, buttocks, and even genitalia.

3. The use of terms like “nipple” to describe the tip of a mountain

This kind of language would not be out of place in a Victorian gentlemen’s club, but it is quite shocking to find it in a mainstream novel. It shows how deeply ingrained sexism was in Victorian society.

4. “Breast” to describe the compass logo

The use of the word “breast” to describe the compass logo is also quite sexist. It suggests that women are nothing more than objects to be gazed upon and desired.

5. The female body as a map

The use of the female body as a map is both sexist and racist. It suggests that African women are nothing more than sexual objects, and that their only purpose is to serve white men’s needs.

6. Colonialism and the map in King Solomon’s Mines

The map in King Solomon’s Mines is full of colonial stereotypes and biases. Africa is portrayed as an untamed wilderness, full of danger and savagery. The only people who are shown any respect are white men. Africans are either portrayed as noble savages or barbaric brutes.

7. The race and sex bias in the map

The map in King Solomon’s Mines is extremely biased against both women and Africans. It shows how deeply ingrained sexism and racism were in Victorian society.

8. Conclusion

The map in King Solomon’s Mines is full of racist and sexist stereotypes. It is a product of its time, and reflects the deep-seated sexism and racism of Victorian society.

FAQ

Landscape mapping plays an important role in King Solomon's Mines by helping the reader to understand the characters' journey and to visualize the different places they visit.

Haggard uses landscape mapping to create a sense of place by providing detailed descriptions of the different locations featured in the novel. These maps help readers to understand the characters' journey and to follow their progress as they travel through different landscapes.

The different ways in which Haggard uses landscape maps throughout the novel include: -Using maps to introduce new locations -Using maps to show changes in location -Using maps to highlight key features of a location

Themaps contribute to our understanding of the characters and their journey by providing us with visual representations of the places they visit and by helping us to follow their progress as they travel through different landscapes.

Without these maps, it would be difficult for readers to understand the characters' journey or to visualize the different places they visit.

There are other novels that make use of similar techniques, such as Jules Verne's Around the World in Eighty Days and Mark Twain's The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.