The Manifestation of Identity in Different Types of Communication

1. Introduction

In a world where we are constantly bombarded with images and messages through different types of media, it is easy to forget that communication is not just about the exchange of information, but also the construction and negotiation of identity. In this essay, I will be discussing the concept of identity, examining the different types of identity that exist, and exploring how these are manifested in different types of communication.

2. Defining identity

The concept of identity is complex and multi-faceted, and there are many different ways to define it. For the purposes of this essay, I will be using the following definition: Identity is the totality of characteristics and experiences that distinguish an individual from others (Dictionary.com, 2018). From this definition, we can see that identity is both something that is internal to the individual (their experiences and characteristics) and something that sets them apart from others (the fact that no two individuals have exactly the same experiences and characteristics).

3. Types of identity

There are many different types of identity, but for the purposes of this essay, I will be focusing on three main types: social identity, cultural identity, and online identity.

3. 1 Social identity

Social identity is the part of our identity that is shaped by our interactions with others in our social group (Tagliamonte & Wudel, 2009). Our social group can be anyone with whom we interact on a regular basis, such as our family, friends, co-workers, or members of a club or organization. Through our interactions with others in our social group, we develop a sense of who we are in relation to them. For example, we may see ourselves as the “fun one” or the “responsible one” in our group of friends. Social identity is often closely linked to our self-esteem – the more positive our social interactions are, the higher our self-esteem is likely to be.

3. 2 Cultural identity

Cultural identity is the part of our identity that is shaped by our culture(s) – the values, beliefs, and behaviours that we learn from our family and community (Berry & Kim, 1988). Culture can be broadly defined as a way of life – it includes everything from language and religion to food and clothing. Our cultural heritage plays a significant role in shaping our cultural identity – for example, if we are raised in a traditional Muslim family, our Islamic beliefs and values will likely play a very important role in our lives. Even if we do not share the same cultural heritage as our parents or grandparents, we can still develop a strong sense of cultural identity through exposure to other cultures – for example, by travelling or by living in a multicultural community.

3. 3 Online identity

Online identity is the part of our identity that is shaped by our interactions with others online (boyd & Heer 2006). With the rise of the internet and social media, more and more people are communicating with each other online – through email, instant messaging, social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, or even just by reading blogs or watching videos on YouTube. When we interact with others online, we are usually not face to face with them – which means that we have more freedom to create an “online persona” or “avatar” that represents us in these virtual spaces. For example, we may create a profile on a social networking site that includes a photo of ourselves, our name, our age, and a brief description of who we are. We can also choose what information we share with others – we may decide to share only our photos and name, or we may choose to share more personal information, such as our thoughts and feelings. Online identity is often seen as being more “fluid” than offline identity, because we have more control over how we present ourselves to others.

4. The link between culture and identity

There is a strong link between culture and identity – our cultural heritage shapes our cultural identity, which in turn shapes our individual identity. Individual identity is made up of the different parts of our identity (such as social identity, cultural identity, and online identity) that we develop through our interactions with others. As our individual identity is shaped by our culture, it is also shaped by the communication that takes place within our culture. In other words, the way we communicate with each other plays a significant role in shaping who we are as individuals.

5. The manifestation of identity in different types of communication

The way we communicate with each other has a big impact on the way our identity is manifested. In this section, I will be discussing how identity is manifested in two different types of communication: face to face communication and online communication.

5. 1 Face to face communication

In face to face communication, our physical appearance is one of the first things that people notice about us. Our clothes, hair, and body language all give others clues about who we are and what kind of person we are. For example, if someone is wearing a suit and tie, they might be perceived as being professional or business-like. If someone has piercings or tattoos, they might be perceived as being rebellious or non-conformist. The way we dress and groom ourselves gives others an idea of the kind of person we are trying to project – whether it is our “true” identity or not.

Another way that our identity is manifested in face to face communication is through the way we speak. The way we use language can give others clues about our age, gender, social class, and cultural background. For example, someone who uses lots of slang words might be perceived as being young or informal; someone who uses formal language might be perceived as being older or more educated; someone who speaks with an accent might be perceived as being from a different country or region. The way we speak also gives others an idea of how confident or self-assertive we are – for example, someone who speaks quietly might be perceived as being shy or timid; someone who speaks loudly might be perceived as being confident or aggressive.

5. 2 Online communication

In online communication, our physical appearance is not seen by others – instead, they see our “online persona” or “avatar”. As mentioned earlier, this is the image that we create of ourselves in virtual spaces like social networking sites or video sharing sites. We can control what information we share about ourselves – for example, we can choose to share only our name and photo, or we can choose to share more personal information, like our thoughts and feelings. We can also control how often we update our profile – for example, some people might choose to update their profile every day, while others might only update it once a month.

The way we communicate with others online can also give them clues about our identity. For example, the way we write can give others clues about our age, gender, social class, and cultural background. The words we use, the way we construct our sentences, and the tone of our writing can all give others clues about who we are. For example, someone who uses lots of slang words might be perceived as being young or informal; someone who uses formal language might be perceived as being older or more educated; someone who writes in a friendly, conversational tone might be perceived as being more approachable than someone who writes in a formal, academic tone.

6. Conclusion

In conclusion, identity is a complex and multi-faceted concept. There are many different types of identity, and these are manifested in different ways in different types of communication. The link between culture and identity is strong – our cultural heritage shapes our cultural identity, which in turn shapes our individual identity. The way we communicate with each other has a big impact on the way our identity is manifested. In face to face communication, our physical appearance and the way we speak give others clues about who we are. In online communication, our “online persona” or “avatar” and the way we communicate with others give them clues about our identity.

FAQ

Communication helps to create and shape our individual identities by giving us a way to express who we are. It allows us to share our thoughts, feelings, and experiences with others, which can help them understand us better. Additionally, communication can help us learn about other people and cultures, which can enrich our own sense of self.

Different types of communication contribute to the formation of our identity in different ways. For example, verbal communication gives us a way to express our thoughts and feelings, while nonverbal communication can reveal aspects of our personality that we may not be aware of. Additionally, the way we communicate with others can say a lot about who we are as individuals.

Our identity is shaped by the way we communicate with others to a large extent. The way we interact with others reveals how we see ourselves and how we want others to see us. Additionally, the relationships we have with others play a big role in shaping our identity.

Personal relationships are important in the development of our identity because they provide opportunities for us to communicate and interact with others on a more personal level. These interactions can help us better understand ourselves and the people around us.

Culture plays a significant role in shaping our identity through communication by influencing the way we think, feel, and behave. It also affects the way we communicate with others and how they perceive us. Understanding different cultures can help us better appreciate diversity and find common ground with people from all walks of life.

Technology does have an impact on how we communicate and, as a result, on our sense of self. For example, social media has made it easier for us to connect with people from all over the world. However, it has also made it easier for us to compare ourselves to others and create unrealistic expectations. Additionally, technology can sometimes make it difficult for us to have face-to-face interactions, which can impact our ability to build relationships and communicate effectively.