The Main Influences on Adopted Children’s Behavior

1. Introduction

Adopted children are exposed to a range of different influences that can shape their behavior. In this essay, we will explore some of the main influences on adopted children’s behavior, including the family setting, the influence of the environment, the influence of genetics, and the interaction between environment and genetics. We will also consider peer influence and social learning. Finally, we will explore the nature vs. nurture debate in relation to adopted children’s behavior.

2. The family setting

The family setting is one of the main influences on adopted children’s behavior. The way that parents interact with their children, the rules that they set, and the values that they instill can all have a significant impact on how children behave. For example, if parents are warm and loving, their children are likely to be happy and well-adjusted, but if parents are cold and distant, their children may be more prone to behavioral problems.

3. The influence of the environment

The environment in which an adopted child grows up can also have a significant impact on their behavior. If a child is raised in a poverty-stricken area with high crime rates, they are more likely to engage in criminal activity themselves when they reach adolescence. Conversely, if a child is raised in a stable and secure home with good schools and plenty of opportunities, they are more likely to do well in life and stay out of trouble.

4. The influence of genetics

It is now widely accepted that genetics play a role in shaping people’s behavior. Studies of twins have shown that there is a strong genetic component to many behavioral traits, such as intelligence, personality, and mental illness. However, it is important to remember that genes are not destiny; they simply increase the likelihood that a person will develop certain behaviors or traits.

5. The interaction between environment and genetics

It is now clear that both environment and genetics play a role in shaping people’s behavior. However, it is important to remember that the two are not independent of each other; they interact with each other to produce unique individuals. For example, a child who has a genetic predisposition for schizophrenia may only develop the disorder if they are raised in an abusive or neglectful environment. Similarly, a child who does not have any genetic predispositions for mental illness may still develop depression or anxiety if they experience traumatic events in their life (such as the death of a parent).

6. Peer influence

Peer influence is another important factor shaping adopted children’s behavior. As children grow older, they increasingly take cues from their peers about how to behave. If an adolescent is hanging around with a group of friends who engage in risky behaviors (such as drug use), they are more likely to engage in those behaviors themselves. On the other hand, if an adolescent has friends who are doing well in school and staying out of trouble, they are more likely to follow suit.

7. Social learning

Social learning theory suggests that people learn behaviors by observing others and imitate those behaviors that are reinforced or rewarded. This process occurs throughout life; we learn new behaviors by observing others and deciding whether or not we want to imitate them. For example, an adolescent might see their friends smoking cigarettes and decide to try it themselves because it looks cool or because they want to fit in. Alternatively, an adolescent might see their friends getting in trouble for smoking and decide not to do it themselves.

8. Nature vs. nurture

The nature vs. nurture debate is relevant to the discussion of influences on adopted children’s behavior. The nature side of the debate suggests that people’s behavior is largely determined by their genetic makeup, while the nurture side suggests that people’s behavior is shaped primarily by their environment and experiences. The truth is that both nature and nurture play a role in shaping people’s behavior; neither one is more important than the other.

9. Conclusion

In conclusion, there are many different factors that can influence adopted children’s behavior. These include the family setting, the influence of the environment, the influence of genetics, and the interaction between environment and genetics. Additionally, peer influence and social learning are also significant factors shaping adopted children’s behavior. Finally, the nature vs. nurture debate is relevant to our understanding of influences on adopted children’s behavior.

FAQ

Being adopted can affect a child's behavior in a number of ways. Some children may feel abandoned or rejected by their birth parents, which can lead to behavioral problems. Additionally, some children may feel like they don't fit in with their adoptive family or community and this can also lead to behavioral issues.

The main influences on an adopted child's behavior are typically the same as those for any other child - their parents, siblings, peers, and so forth. However, because adopted children often have unique experiences and perspectives, they may be more susceptible to certain behavioral issues than other kids.

Adoptive parents influence their child's behavior in the same way that all parents do - through love, guidance, and support. However, because they may not have a biological connection to their child, they may need to work harder to establish trust and create a bond. Additionally, adoptive parents should be aware of the unique challenges that their child may face and be prepared to help them cope with any difficulties that arise.

Birthparents usually have very little influence on an adopted child's behavior once the adoption is finalized. In some cases, there may be ongoing contact between the birthparent and adoptee (such as in open adoptions), but even then the influence is typically limited.

Having siblings who are also adopted can affect a child's behavior in both positive and negative ways. On one hand, it can provide comfort and support knowing that there are others who understand what it feels like to be adopted. On the other hand, it can also add to feelings of isolation if the siblings are not close in age or do not share similar interests/experiences.

Culture and ethnicity can play a role in an adopted child's behavior in a number of ways. For example, if the child is of a different race than their adoptive parents, they may experience racism or discrimination from others. Additionally, if the child is from a different culture than their adoptive family, they may feel like they don't fit in or belong.

Religion can also play a role in shaping an adoptee’s behavior, particularly if the child is raised in a religious household that is different from their birth religion. In some cases, this can lead to conflict or confusion about beliefs and values.