The Life and Works of Louis Lozowick

1. Introduction:

Louis Lozowick (1892-1973) was one among the artistic legends of the modern art who was a well acknowledged as a Precisionist artist and an Art Deco. He was born on August 23, 1892, in Kiev, Ukraine which was then a part of the Russian Empire. He migrated to the United States in 1913 and settled in New York City. After completing his graduation from Columbia University, he started teaching at several art schools including the National Academy of Design, Yale University, and Cooper Union. In the year 1918, he became an American citizen.

2. The Life of Louis Lozowick:

Lozowick’s parents were Jewish and his father was a grain merchant. As a child, he loved to read American novels which inspired him to migrate to the United States. In 1913, at the age of 21, he finally made his way to New York City via Liverpool and Ellis Island. He had just $50 in his pocket when he reached America($10 of which he wasted on taxicabs).

He initially stayed with his cousins in Brooklyn and later moved to Manhattan where he found a job as a stenographer in a law firm. Soon he started taking art classes at night while working during the day to support himself. In 1916, he enrolled himself at the National Academy of Design but he was not satisfied with the traditional approach to teaching there. So he quit the course and joined the Art Students League where he came in contact with some influential artists like George Bellows and Thomas Hart Benton.

In 1918, Lozowick finally got his big break when one of his drawings was included in an exhibition at the Society of Independent Artists. The same year he also became an American citizen. After serving in the army for a brief period during World War I, he resumed his art studies and traveled to Europe on a government grant in 1920.

In Europe, he was greatly influenced by the works of Paul Cézanne, Pablo Picasso, and Georges Braque. He also visited Russia where he witnessed the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 firsthand. The experiences from his travels abroad can be seen in his paintings which often depict urban landscapes full of industrial buildings and machinery.

In 1923, Lozowick returned to New York and started working as an illustrator for several magazines including The New Yorker and Vanity Fair. His first solo show was held at Weyhe Gallery in 1926 where he exhibited 11 drawings and 14 lithographs. The same year he also co-founded “ bridge” with John French Sloan and Stuart Davis which was an art group that promoted Precisionism – an American movement that sought to capture the industrial age through clean lines and geometric forms.

Lozowick’s work from this period is characterized by its sharp angles, precise lines, and flat surfaces which give it a machine-like quality. His most famous work from this period is “Rolling Mill” (1927) which depicts workers near Pittsburgh Steel Mills. In general, his work from this period reflects his fascination with technology and modernity.

In the 1930s, Lozowick’s style began to change as he started experimenting with abstraction. He became increasingly interested in simple forms and planes which can be seen in his later works such as “City” (1932) and “Lullaby” (1937). In the 1940s, he returned to figurative work and started painting portraits and landscapes. He also became involved with politics and joined the Communist Party in the early 1940s.

Despite his involvement with the party, Lozowick’s work from this period is not didactic or propaganda-like. Instead, it focuses on simple and everyday scenes such as farmers in their fields or people riding on a train. In the 1950s, he started teaching at Yale University where he remained until his retirement in 1962. He died in New York City on December 16, 1973, at the age of 81.

3. The Works of Louis Lozowick:

Lozowick was a versatile artist who worked in a variety of mediums including painting, drawing, lithography, and etching. He is best known for his urban landscapes which often depict industrial scenes full of factories and machines. His work from the 1920s is characterized by its sharp angles, precise lines, and flat surfaces which give it a machine-like quality.

One of his most famous works from this period is “Rolling Mill” (1927) which depicts workers near Pittsburgh Steel Mills. In general, his work from this period reflects his fascination with technology and modernity. In the 1930s, Lozowick’s style began to change as he started experimenting with abstraction. He became increasingly interested in simple forms and planes which can be seen in his later works such as “City” (1932) and “Lullaby” (1937).

In the 1940s, he returned to figurative work and started painting portraits and landscapes. Despite his involvement with the Communist Party, Lozowick’s work from this period is not didactic or propaganda-like. Instead, it focuses on simple and everyday scenes such as farmers in their fields or people riding on a train.

4. Conclusion:

Louis Lozowick was a versatile artist who worked in a variety of mediums including painting, drawing, lithography, and etching. He is best known for his urban landscapes which often depict industrial scenes full of factories and machines. His work from the 1920s is characterized by its sharp angles, precise lines, and flat surfaces which give it a machine-like quality. In the 1930s, Lozowick’s style began to change as he started experimenting with abstraction. He became increasingly interested in simple forms and planes which can be seen in his later works such as “City” (1932) and “Lullaby” (1937). In the 1940s, he returned to figurative work and started painting portraits and landscapes. Despite his involvement with the Communist Party, Lozowick’s work from this period is not didactic or propaganda-like. Instead, it focuses on simple and everyday scenes such as farmers in their fields or people riding on a train.

FAQ

Louis Lozowick was motivated to become an artist by his love of art and his desire to express himself creatively.

Louis Lozowick's artistic style developed over the course of his career as he experimented with different mediums and techniques. Some of the most iconic works by Louis Lozowick are his lithographs, which he is known for using strong geometric shapes and clean lines to create a sense of order and harmony.

The legacy of Louis Lozowick has influenced subsequent generations of artists by demonstrating that it is possible to create beautiful and meaningful art using simple forms and basic colors.

Additionally, Lozowick's work has inspired many artists to experiment with different mediums and techniques in order to create their own unique styles.