The Inequalities between White People and Black Africans in “Cry the Beloved Country”

1. Introduction

The book “Cry the Beloved Country” by Paton, who has indicated the ‘Beloved Country’ as to being on the run for the South African literature demonstrating about apartheid. It is Paton’s first novel, which was published in 1948. The story is based on the life of Stephen Kumalo and his family, who live in a small village named Ndotsheni in Kwazulu-Natal. Stephen Kumalo is a black African priest, who goes to Johannesburg in search of his sister and his son. There he meets with many problems caused by social injustice and racial inequality.

The book “Cry the Beloved Country” is considered to be one of the most important works of South African literature. It has been translated into more than thirty languages and has sold millions of copies worldwide. The book has also been made into a movie and a stage play.

2. Themes and analysis
2.1. Inequalities between white people and black Africans

One of the main themes of the book is the inequality between white people and black Africans. White people have always had more power than black Africans. They have always had better jobs, better salaries, and better education. Black Africans have always been treated like second-class citizens.

In the book, we can see how Stephen Kumalo struggles to find a job because he is black. He is also not able to get a loan from the bank because he does not have enough money. We can also see how Absalom is discriminated against because he is black. He is not given a fair trial and is sentenced to death even though he did not commit the crime he is accused of.

2. 2. Social injustice

Another theme of the book is social injustice. In South Africa, there was a lot of social injustice during the time when the book was written. White people had all the power and they used it to exploit black Africans. They did not give them equal rights or opportunities.

In the book, we can see how Stephen Kumalo’s family suffers because of social injustice. Stephen’s sister Gertrude is forced to live in a squalid house because she cannot afford anything better. Stephen’s brother John Kumalo is arrested and put in jail even though he has done nothing wrong. We can also see how Absalom suffers because of social injustice when he is denied a fair trial and sentenced to death even though he did not commit the crime he is accused of.

2ailure to provide for his family financially despite being given multiple opportunities, including working for James Jarvis as head Native Commissioner). Jarvis provides more opportunities for Kumalo than any other white man in Johannesburg yet Kumalo still fails (although this may be due to factors beyond his control).Stephen’s failure as head of his own household highlights his failure as a member of society as well – if he cannot take care of his own then how can he take care of anyone else? This dichotomy shows that even good men like Stephen can be ultimately powerless against societal structures that are bigger than them.

2. 3. The role of churches

Another theme of the book is the role of churches. In South Africa, the churches have always played a very important role. They have been the moral center of the country. They have always fought for justice and equality.

In the book, we can see how the church helps Stephen Kumalo to find his sister and his son. We can also see how the church helps Absalom to get a fair trial. We can also see how the church helps John Kumalo to get out of jail.

3. Characters
3.1. Stephen Kumalo

Stephen Kumalo is the main character of the book. He is a black African priest who lives in a small village named Ndotsheni in Kwazulu-Natal. He goes to Johannesburg in search of his sister and his son. There he meets with many problems caused by social injustice and racial inequality. Stephen is a good man who is trying to do his best in a difficult situation. However, he is ultimately powerless against the forces of social injustice and racial inequality.

3. 2. Absalom Kumalo

Absalom Kumalo is Stephen’s son. He is a black African who lives in Johannesburg. He is accused of murdering a white man named Arthur Jarvis. Even though he did not commit the crime, he is sentenced to death because of the racial inequality in the judicial system. Absalom is a good man who has been dealt a bad hand by society. He is a victim of social injustice and racial discrimination.

3. 3. Gertrude

Gertrude is Stephen’s sister. She is a black African who lives in Johannesburg. She is forced to live in a squalid house because she cannot afford anything better. She is also an alcoholic and has many health problems. Gertrude is a victim of social injustice and poverty.

4Conclusion: Cry, the Beloved Country by Paton highlights the severe societal problems caused by apartheid through effective storytelling and relatable characters that demonstrate the human capacity for immense strength in difficult circumstances as well as hope for reconciliation between races

FAQ

Racial inequality in "Cry, the Beloved Country" is manifested through the separation of black and white people. Blacks are forced to live in their own area, called Ndotsheni, while whites live in the city. There is also a lot of violence between the two groups.

Some of the root causes of racial inequality in the novel are colonialism and apartheid. These policies have led to economic disparities between blacks and whites, as well as social segregation.

The characters react to racial inequality in different ways. Some, like Stephen Kumalo, try to understand it and work towards solutions. Others, like Absalom Kumalo, lash out in anger and violence.

Paton does not explicitly propose any solutions for addressing racial inequality, but he does suggest that understanding and communication between blacks and whites is necessary for progress to be made.