The Impact of Texas’ Changing Demographics

1. Introduction

The US Census Bureau recently released its 2017 population estimates for the nation, states, and counties. These estimates compile data from the 2010 census with information on births, deaths, and migration to estimate the size and characteristics of the U.S. population on July 1, 2017. The new data shows that Texas was the fastest growing state in the United States between 2016 and 2017, with a population increase of almost 400,000 people. This growth is largely attributable to natural increase (more births than deaths) and net international migration.

Between 2010 and 2017, Texas’ population grew by 4 million people, an increase of 14%. The state’s racial and ethnic composition also changed during this time. The share of the population that is non-Hispanic white decreased from 45% in 2010 to 42% in 2017. At the same time, the share of Texas’ population that is Hispanic or Latino increased from 38% to 41%.

2. Demographic changes in Texas

Texas’s population growth has been driven by natural increase (more births than deaths) and net international migration. From 2010 to 2016, natural increase accounted for 55% of Texas’s population growth, while net international migration accounted for 45%. However, these rates have changed over time. In the early 1990s, natural increase contributed more than 70% of Texas’s population growth, while net international migration only contributed around 30%. By 2000, the shares had reversed, and net international migration was responsible for more than 60% of Texas’s population growth, while natural increase only contributed around 40%.

Since 2010, both natural increase and net international migration have contributed to Texas’s population growth. However, the relative importance of each has changed over time. In 2010-2011, natural increase contributed more to Texas’s population growth than net international migration. However, starting in 2012-2013, net international migration has been responsible for a larger share of Texas’s population growth than natural increase. In 2016-2017, net international migration was responsible for 58% of Texas’s population growth, while natural increase only contributed 42%.

3. Texas city’s changing demographics

The changing demographics of Texas are most evident in its largest cities. In 2010, Houston was 43% Hispanic or Latino, 38% non-Hispanic white, 11% non-Hispanic black, and 8% Asian. By 2017, Houston had become 47% Hispanic or Latino, 35% non-Hispanic white, 11% non-Hispanic black, and 6% Asian. Austin was 37% Hispanic or Latino, 35% non-Hispanic white, 10% non-Hispanic black, and 7% Asian in 2010; by 2017 it had become 43% Hispanic or Latino, 32 % non-Hispanic white, 9 % non-Hispanic black, and 6 % Asian. Dallas was 42 % Hispanic or Latino, 32 % non-Hispanic white, 12 % non-Hispanic black, and 6 % Asian in 2010 ; by 2017 it had become 45 % Hispanic or Latino, 30 % non-Hispanic white, 11 % non-Hispanic black, and 5 % Asian. San Antonio was 63 % Hispanic or Latino, 28 % non-Hispanic white, 5 % non-Hispanic black, and 3 % Asian in 2010 ; by 2017 it had become 64 % Hispanic or Latino, 27 % non-Hispanic white, 5 % non-Hispanic black, and 3 % Asian.

4. Implications of demographic change in Texas

The changing demographics of Texas have a number of implications for the state’s economy and politics. One is that the state’s workforce is becoming increasingly diverse. In 2010, Hispanics or Latinos made up 34% of Texas’s labor force; by 2016, they made up 40%. At the same time, the share of the labor force that is non-Hispanic white has decreased from 60% in 2010 to 54% in 2016.

The changing demographics of Texas’s workforce has implications for the state’s economy. A more diverse workforce can help businesses tap into new markets and further diversify the state’s economy. The state’s workforce is also getting younger. The median age of Texas’s workforce was 34 in 2016, down from 35 in 2010. A younger workforce can bring new energy and ideas to businesses and help offset the retirement of baby boomers.

The changing demographics of Texas also have implications for the state’s politics. The state’s population is becoming increasingly Hispanic or Latino, which is likely to result in an increase in the number of Hispanic or Latino elected officials. The state’s congressional delegation has already seen an increase in Hispanic or Latino members, from 3 in 2010 to 9 in 2018. The changing demographics of Texas are also likely to result in an increase in support for Democratic candidates. In 2016, Hillary Clinton won 52% of the Hispanic or Latino vote in Texas, compared to Donald Trump’s 44%.

5. Conclusion

The changing demographics of Texas are having a profound impact on the state’s economy and politics. As the state’s population grows and becomes increasingly diverse, businesses and elected officials will need to adjust accordingly.

FAQ

The most significant demographic changes taking place in Texas are an increase in the Hispanic population and a decrease in the Anglo population.

The state's population is changing because more Hispanics are moving to Texas and Anglos are moving out of Texas.

Texas is experiencing these changes because it is a desirable place to live for Hispanics and because the cost of living is becoming too high for many Anglos.

The impact of these demographic shifts on the state's economy will be positive, as more people will be working and spending money in the state. However, the impact on politics could be negative, as there could be more tension between different groups vying for political power.

To mitigate any negative impacts of these demographic shifts, it is important to create policies that encourage economic growth and opportunity for all Texans, regardless of race or ethnicity.