The Exploitation Theory of Racial Subordination: A History and Analysis

1. Theory of racial subordination

The exploitation theory of racial subordination or prejudice is a theory used to seek justification for keeping a group of people defined by race in a lower class in the society. The theory has its roots in the Marxian tradition and has been popularized in the American society (Jackson, 1992). The theory argues that the members of the subordinate group are being exploited by the members of the dominant group. The theory has been used to justify affirmative action programs and has had legal implications.

2. Marxian tradition

The exploitation theory of racial subordination has its roots in the Marxian tradition. Karl Marx was a German philosopher who developed the Marxist tradition. Marx believed that history is determined by economic factors. He argued that there is a struggle between the bourgeoisie and the proletariat. The bourgeoisie are the owners of the means of production and the proletariat are the workers who sell their labor power to the bourgeoisie. The proletariat are exploited by the bourgeoisie and this leads to class conflict.

3. American society

The exploitation theory of racial subordination has been popularized in the American society. The theory has been used to justify affirmative action programs. Affirmative action programs are designed to increase the representation of minorities in education and employment. The theory has also had legal implications. In 1978, the Supreme Court ruled that affirmative action programs were constitutional if they were designed to remedy past discrimination.

4. Implications

The exploitation theory of racial subordination has had legal implications. In 1978, the Supreme Court ruled that affirmative action programs were constitutional if they were designed to remedy past discrimination. This ruling was based on the principle of equal protection under the law. The principle of equal protection under the law states that all individuals are entitled to equal protection from discrimination under the law.

5. Pluralism

The exploitation theory of racial subordination has also been used to justify pluralism. Pluralism is a system in which two or more groups coexist within a society but maintain their own distinct identities. Pluralism is often used to describe societies with multiple ethnic or religious groups. Proponents of pluralism argue that it allows for cultural diversity and promotes social harmony. Opponents argue that it can lead to discrimination and violence.

6. Education

The exploitation theory of racial subordination has also been used to justify education reform initiatives. Education reform initiatives are designed to improve educational outcomes for all students, regardless of race or socioeconomic status. Proponents argue that education reform is necessary to close achievement gaps and ensure that all students have access to quality education opportunities. Opponents argue that education reform initiatives can lead to increased testing and standardized curriculum, which can have negative consequences for students, teachers, and schools. sex, color and origin8. Conclusion

The exploitation theory of racial subordination is a theory used to seek justification for keeping a group of people defined by race in a lower class in the society. The theory has its roots in the Marxian tradition and has been popularized in the American society. The theory argues that the members of the subordinate group are being exploited by the members of the dominant group. The theory has been used to justify affirmative action programs and has had legal implications.

FAQ

Racial subordination is the act of one race dominating another through political, economic, or social power.

Racial subordination manifests itself in society through segregated housing, unequal access to education and employment opportunities, and discriminatory laws and practices.

The causes of racial subordination are historical factors such as slavery and colonialism, as well as contemporary factors such as racism and discrimination.

The effects of racial subordination on individuals include feelings of inferiority, isolation, and despair; while the effects on society as a whole include reduced economic productivity, increased crime rates, and heightened tensions between different racial groups.