The debate on juvenile conviction: should juveniles be tried and convicted as adults?

1. Introduction

In the United States, the age at which a person is considered to be a juvenile offender varies from state to state. In some states, it is as low as seven years old, while in others, it is as high as eighteen years old.
However, the debate on whether or not juveniles should be tried and convicted as adults has been going on for many years now.

There are those who believe that juveniles should not be tried and convicted as adults because they are still children and they have not yet developed fully mentally and emotionally.
They also argue that juveniles should not be given adult punishments because they are not yet capable of understanding the consequences of their actions.

On the other hand, there are also those who believe that juveniles should be tried and convicted as adults because they commit serious crimes and they should be given harsher punishments than what they would receive if they were treated as juveniles.

2. The debate on juvenile conviction

The debate on whether or not juveniles should be tried and convicted as adults has been going on for many years now.
There are those who believe that juveniles should not be tried and convicted as adults because they are still children and they have not yet developed fully mentally and emotionally.
They also argue that juveniles should not be given adult punishments because they are not yet capable of understanding the consequences of their actions.

On the other hand, there are also those who believe that juveniles should be tried and convicted as adults because they commit serious crimes and they should be given harsher punishments than what they would receive if they were treated as juveniles.

3. Features of conviction of juvenile offenders

There are a few features of conviction of juvenile offenders that need to be taken into account. The first feature is the type of crime that the juvenile has committed. If the crime is a serious one, then the chances of the juvenile being tried and convicted as an adult are much higher.

The second feature is the age of the juvenile offender. If the juvenile is below the age of eighteen, then there is a higher chance of him or her being tried and convicted as an adult.
The reason for this is because minors are usually given lighter sentences compared to adults.

The third feature is the jurisdiction in which the case will be heard. If the case will be heard in a state where the age limit for being tried and convicted as an adult is lower, then there is a higher chance of the juvenile being tried and convicted as an adult.

4. Conclusion

The debate on whether or not juveniles should be tried and convicted as adults is one that has been going on for many years now with no clear winner in sight. Both sides have their own arguments and there is no clear consensus on which side is right.
However, what needs to be kept in mind is that there are a few features of conviction of juvenile offenders that need to be taken into account before a decision can be made on whether or not to try and convict them as adults.

FAQ

The main features of conviction of juvenile offenders include a criminal record, fines, and probation.

The criminal justice system treats juveniles differently from adults because they are not considered as culpable for their actions.

Some juveniles are sentenced to life in prison without parole because of the severity of their crimes.

States differ in their treatment of juvenile offenders depending on the state's laws and policies.

A conviction can have a negative effect on a juvenile's future, such as limiting employment opportunities and increasing the likelihood of recidivism.

There are alternatives to incarceration for juvenile offenders, such as community service, probation, and diversion programs