The Crazies and Bram Stoker’s Dracula: A Connection

1. Introduction: The Crazies and Bram Stoker’s Dracula

The Crazies is a 2010 American horror film directed by Breck Eisner and written by Scott Kosar and Raymond Ennis. The film stars Timothy Olyphant, Radha Mitchell, Danielle Panabaker, andJoe Anderson. It is a remake of the 1973 film of the same name by George A. Romero.

The Crazies tells the story of a small town that is infected by a virus that makes its residents go insane and become violent. The town is quarantined by the military, but a group of survivors must fight for their lives when the army begins to kill everyone in sight.

The Crazies was released on February 26, 2010, in the United States to mixed reviews from critics. However, it was a box office success, grossing $39 million against its $20 million budget.

The film has several themes including identity, connection, and the idea of the “Other”. These themes are also present in Bram Stoker’s novel, Dracula. In this paper, I will be discussing the connection between The Crazies and Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

2. Analysis of The Crazies

2.1 Themes of identity and connection

One of the main themes present in The Crazies is identity. The townspeople are forced to confront who they are when they are infected with the virus. They must decide whether to give into their violent urges or to fight against them. For some, the virus brings out their true nature, while for others it causes them to act in ways that are completely out of character. This theme is also present in Dracula. In the novel, Dracula represents the id, while Van Helsing represents the ego. As Dracula starts to take over Lucy’s body, Van Helsing must fight to keep her alive. He must also decide whether or not to kill her in order to save her from Dracula’s control.

Another theme present in both The Crazies and Dracula is connection. In The Crazies, the townspeople are forced to come together in order to survive. They must rely on each other for help and support. This theme is also present in Dracula. In the novel, Lucy is turned into a vampire by Dracula and she starts to prey on children. Van Helsing and his friends must work together in order to stop her from harming anyone else. They must also find a way to protect themselves from her attacks.

2. 2 The idea of the “Other”

The Crazies also explores the idea of the “Other”. The townspeople are infected with a virus that makes them go insane. They are seen as a threat by the outside world and are treated as such. The military arrives in order to contain the situation, but they end up making things worse. The townspeople are seen as monsters that need to be killed. In Dracula, the vampires are also seen as the “Other”. They are feared and persecuted by those who do not understand them. Van Helsing and his friends must find a way to stop Dracula and his vampire army before they can take over the world.

3. Conclusion

The Crazies is a 2010 American horror film directed by Breck Eisner and written by Scott Kosar and Raymond Ennis. The film stars Timothy Olyphant, Radha Mitchell, Danielle Panabaker, and Joe Anderson. It is a remake of the 1973 film of the same name by George A. Romero.

The Crazies tells the story of a small town that is infected by a virus that makes its residents go insane and become violent. The town is quarantined by the military, but a group of survivors must fight for their lives when the army begins to kill everyone in sight.

The Crazies was released on February 26, 2010, in the United States to mixed reviews from critics. However, it was a box office success, grossing $39 million against its $20 million budget.

The film has several themes including identity, connection, and the idea of the “Other”. These themes are also present in Bram Stoker’s novel, Dracula. In this paper, I have discussed the connection between The Crazies and Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

FAQ

"The Crazies" by Paul McCollough explores identity and connection with Stoker's "Dracula" through the use of characters that are struggling to come to terms with their own sense of self. Both texts offer insights into the human condition, but "The Crazies" does so in a more explicit way.

Some key similarities between the two works include the fact that both texts deal with issues of identity and connection, and both offer insights into the human condition. Some key differences between the two works include the fact that "The Crazies" is more explicit in its exploration of these themes, and that it uses characters who are struggling with their own sense of self.

The characters in each work grapple with their own sense of self in different ways. In "The Crazies", the characters are explicitly struggling to come to terms with their own identities, while in "Dracula", the characters are more concerned with grappling with their connections to others.

In terms of offering insights into the human condition, both texts do so in different ways. "The Crazies" is more explicit in its exploration of these themes, while "Dracula" offers a more subtle examination of them.