The conflict between two sisters in “Why I Live at the P.O.”

1. Introduction

Eudora Welty’s “Why I Live at the P.O.” is a story that takes the form of dramatic monologue. The main character by the name “Sister” gives the story of her side of the family spat. Sister tells the story of how her younger sister, Stella-Rondo, had an affair with Mr. Whitaker and how Stella-Rondo’s kimono caught fire from some errant firecrackers.

The story is set in the small town of Jeanesville, Mississippi. The majority of the action takes place at the post office, which is also Sister’s home. The post office is a central location in the town and provides a gathering place for many of the town’s residents.

The story revolves around the conflict between the two sisters, Stella-Rondo and Sister. The conflict is fueled by jealousy and resentment on both sides. Stella-Rondo is jealous of Sister’s relationship with their father, while Sister is resentful of Stella-Rondo’s affair with Mr. Whitaker.

The conflict between the sisters comes to a head when Stella-Rondo’s kimono catches fire from some errant fireworks. The kimono is a symbol of Stella-Rondo’s Japanese heritage and is very important to her. The destruction of the kimono leads to a physical altercation between the two sisters.

The conflict is eventually resolved when Mr. Whitaker convinces Stella-Rondo to leave Jeanesville and move to Shirley-T with him. This leaves Sister as the sole inhabitant of the post office and Jeanesville itself.

2. The main character’s back story

Sister is the narrator of “Why I Live at the P.O.” and as such, we are privy to her thoughts and feelings on the events that take place in Jeanesville. Sister is a bitter woman who seems to have a chip on her shoulder about most things in life.

It is revealed early on in the story that Sister has a strained relationship with her father. It is implied that her father favors Stella-Rondo over her, which has led to Sisters feeling isolated and resentful towards him.

Sister’s relationship with her mother is also somewhat strained. She seems to be disappointed with her mother for not being more assertive in her marriage and for not taking steps to improve her own social standing in life.

Sister’s feelings of isolation and resentment are also directed towards Stella-Rondo herself. It is clear that she envies Stella-Rondo’s beauty and youthfulness. She also resents Stella-Rondo for her affair with Mr. Whitaker, which she views as a betrayal of their sisterhood bond.

3. The conflict between the sisters

The conflict between Sister and Stella-Rondo begins early on in “Why I Live at the P.”, when it becomes clear that there are feelings of jealousy and resentment on both sides. As previously mentioned, Sister feels isolated from her father’s affections and resents him for favoring Stella-Rondo instead. In contrast, Stella-Rondo is jealous of Sister’s close relationship with him

This jealousy comes to a head when Stella-Rondo’s kimono catches fire from some errant fireworks. The kimono is a symbol of Stella-Rondo’s Japanese heritage and is very important to her. The destruction of the kimono leads to a physical altercation between the two sisters.

The conflict is eventually resolved when Mr. Whitaker convinces Stella-Rondo to leave Jeanesville and move to Shirley-T with him. This leaves Sister as the sole inhabitant of the post office and Jeanesville itself.

4. Stella-Rondo’s role in the conflict

Stella-Rondo plays a central role in the conflict between the sisters. As previously mentioned, she is jealous of Sister’s relationship with their father and resents her for not taking steps to improve her own social standing in life.

This jealousy comes to a head when Stella-Rondo’s kimono catches fire from some errant fireworks. The kimono is a symbol of Stella-Rondo’s Japanese heritage and is very important to her. The destruction of the kimono leads to a physical altercation between the two sisters.

The conflict is eventually resolved when Mr. Whitaker convinces Stella-Rondo to leave Jeanesville and move to Shirley-T with him. This leaves Sister as the sole inhabitant of the post office and Jeanesville itself.

5. Mr. Whitaker’s role in the conflict

Mr. Whitaker plays a significant role in the resolution of the conflict between the sisters. He is the one who convinces Stella-Rondo to leave Jeanesville and move to Shirley-T with him. This leaves Sister as the sole inhabitant of the post office and Jeanesville itself.

6. The resolution of the conflict

The conflict between Sister and Stella-Rondo is resolved when Mr. Whitaker convinces Stella-Rondo to leave Jeanesville and move to Shirley-T with him. This leaves Sister as the sole inhabitant of the post office and Jeanesville itself.

7. Conclusion

“Why I Live at the P.O.” is a story about the conflict between two sisters, Stella-Rondo and Sister. The conflict is fueled by jealousy and resentment on both sides. Stella-Rondo is jealous of Sister’s relationship with their father, while Sister is resentful of Stella-Rondo’s affair with Mr. Whitaker.

The conflict comes to a head when Stella-Rondo’s kimono catches fire from some errant fireworks. The kimono is a symbol of Stella-Rondo’s Japanese heritage and is very important to her. The destruction of the kimono leads to a physical altercation between the two sisters.

The conflict is eventually resolved when Mr. Whitaker convinces Stella-Rondo to leave Jeanesville and move to Shirley-T with him. This leaves Sister as the sole inhabitant of the post office and Jeanesville itself.

FAQ

The protagonist's name is Sister and she is a postmistress.

The story takes place in a small town in the American South called Sycamore. The setting is very rural and isolated.

The protagonist lives at the post office because she feels it is her duty to do so, since she is the postmistress. She also feels that living at the post office gives her a sense of importance and belonging.

Some of the other characters in the story include Sister's mother, father, sister-in-law, and nephews. Sister's mother and father are both retired and live with her sister-in-law. Her nephews are young boys who are always causing trouble.

One of the themes explored in "Why I Live at the P.O." is family dynamics. Another theme that is explored is isolation and loneliness