The Civil Rights Act of 1964: Prohibiting Discrimination in Employment

1. Introduction

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a federal law that prohibits discrimination in employment based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against an employee for filing a discrimination complaint.

2. The Civil Rights Act of 1964

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2, 1964. The law prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.

3. Employers and employees

Under the Civil Rights Act of 1964, employers are prohibited from discriminating against employees on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Employees who believe they have been discriminated against may file a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

4. The Peace City Salon

The Peace City Salon is a hair salon in Atlanta, Georgia. The salon has four employees: two African-American stylists, one white stylist, and one Hispanic stylist. The salon owner, Mrs. Wilkinson, is white.

One day, Mrs. Wilkinson told the African-American stylists that they could only work on Tuesdays and Thursdays because she did not want their “type” of hair in her salon during the week. The African-American stylists complained to the EEOC, and Mrs. Wilkinson was charged with racial discrimination in employment.

5. Martin’s Shoes Company

Martin’s Shoes Company is a shoe store in Miami, Florida. The store has eight employees: four salespeople and four stock clerks. Two of the salespeople are Hispanic, one is African American, and one is white. Two of the stock clerks are Hispanic, one is African American, and one is white.

The store manager, Mr. Martin, told the Hispanic salespeople that they could only work on Saturdays because he did not want Spanish-speaking customers to be “confused” by them during the week. The Hispanic salespeople complained to the EEOC, and Mr. Martin was charged with national origin discrimination in employment.
6. Spanish-speaking employees In February 2015 McDonald’s was sued for allegedly allowing harassment of Spanish-speaking employees at one of its restaurants in Nebraska. The harassment allegedly included co-workers and customers making fun of employees’ accents and repeatedly asking them to speak English.

7. Weight capacity

In May 2015, a federal court in New York held that an employer may not require employees to maintain a certain weight as a condition of employment. The court said that such a requirement constitutes discrimination on the basis of physical appearance.

8. Elevator

In July 2015, a federal court in Maryland held that an employer may not require employees to use the elevator instead of the stairs when travelling between floors. The court said that such a requirement constitutes discrimination on the basis of disability.

9. Conclusion

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Employees who believe they have been discriminated against may file a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

FAQ

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act is a federal law that prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.

Title VII protects employees from discrimination in the workplace by prohibiting employers from making decisions regarding hiring, firing, promotions, or any other aspect of employment based on an individual's protected status.

Some common examples of discriminatory practices that would be covered under Title VII include refusing to hire someone because of their race or gender, paying employees different wages based on their protected status, and creating a hostile work environment through harassment or other forms of discrimination.