The Changing Policy Landscape of Ocean Dumping

1. Introduction

The dumping of waste in the ocean has been a controversial issue for a long time, with different stakeholders having varying opinions on the matter. While some believe that it is an effective way to get rid of waste, others assert that it is a form of pollution that needs to be stopped. Over the years, various policies have been put in place in an attempt to control ocean dumping, with varying degrees of success. In this essay, I will discuss the changing policy landscape with regard to ocean dumping and the various factors that have fuelled this change.

2. What is ocean dumping?

Ocean dumping refers to the act of disposing of waste in the ocean. This can be done deliberately or accidentally, and the waste can be in solid, liquid, or gaseous form. Ocean dumping is a contentious issue because it can have a negative impact on the environment and human health. For instance, when toxic chemicals are dumped in the ocean, they can bioaccumulate in marine life and eventually end up in the food chain, where they can cause health problems in humans. Furthermore, ocean dumping can also lead to the formation of marine debris islands, which can damage coastal ecosystems. As such, there is a growing calls for a reduction in ocean dumping and for policies to be put in place to control it.

3. The value of life and water transport

One of the key factors that has fuelled the change in policy with regard to ocean dumping is the increasing value placed on human life and water transport. In the past, ocean dumping was seen as an effective way to get rid of waste because it was out of sight and out of mind. However, as our understanding of the environment has grown, we have come to realize that what happens in the oceans doesn’t stay there – it can have a direct impact on our own health and well-being. This is particularly true for water transport, which is vitally important for both trade and tourism. If the oceans are polluted, it will not only have an impact on marine life but also on humans who rely on water transport for their livelihoods. As such, there is a greater incentive to protect the oceans from pollution and to invest in policies that will control ocean dumping.

4. Pollution of the ocean

Another factor that has contributed to changes in policy with regard to ocean dumping is the growing awareness of the problem of pollution. In particular, there is a greater understanding of how pollution affects not just marine life but also humans who rely on the oceans for their livelihoods. As such, there is a heightened concern about the need to protect the oceans from pollution and to invest in policies that will control ocean dumping. This is particularly true in light of recent estimates which suggest that plastic pollution could increase by orders of magnitude over the next few decades unless action is taken to control it (Collins et al., 2018).

5. Conclusion

In conclusion, it is clear that there has been a shift in policy with regard to ocean dumping over recent years. This shift has been driven by a number of factors, including the increasing value placed on human life and water transport, as well as a growing awareness of problem of pollution. As such, there is a greater incentive to invest in policies that will control ocean dumping and reduce its impact on the environment and human health.

FAQ

The types of materials commonly dumped into the ocean include sewage, plastic, oil, and chemical waste.

Ocean dumping impacts marine life and ecosystems in a variety of ways. For example, it can pollute the water and make it unsafe for marine life to live in. Additionally, it can also introduce harmful chemicals and pollutants into the food chain which can ultimately impact human health.

There are a number of policies that exist to control ocean dumping. For example, the London Convention is an international treaty that prohibits the intentional dumping of wastes at sea. Additionally, many countries have their own national laws and regulations governing ocean dumping within their territorial waters.

While there are a number of policies in place to control ocean dumping, they are not always effective in completely preventing it from happening. This is due to a number of factors such as lack of enforcement or weak penalties for violators. Additionally, some countries may not have the capacity or infrastructure to properly manage their waste which leads to them illegally dumping it into the ocean instead.

There are a number of reasons why some countries continue to dump waste into the ocean despite international agreements against it. One reason is that it is often cheaper than disposing of waste properly on land . Additionally, some countries may not have adequate landfill space available or they may lack the proper infrastructure needed to recycle or process their waste . As a result, they resort to illegal ocean dumping as a way to get rid of their waste .

In order to further reduce or eliminate ocean dumping , there needs to be greater enforcement of existing laws and regulations . Additionally , investments need to be made in developing countries so that they have the capacity and infrastructure needed to properly manage their waste . Finally , public awareness needs to be raised about the issue so that people are more conscious about how their actions can impact the environment .