The 2008 American Presidential Election: A Comparison of the Candidates’ Views

1. Introduction

The American presidential election is one of the most keenly contested and watched political events in the world. This is because the American president is often seen as the leader of the free world and as such, his policies and actions have a huge impact on global politics and economics. The two main candidates in the 2008 American presidential election were John McCain of the Republican Party and Barack Obama of the Democratic Party. In this essay, we will compare and contrast the two candidates’ views on some of the major issues facing America today. These issues include abortion, taxes, global warming, and clean technology. We will also attempt to discern which candidate would be better for America if he were to win the election.

2. The Candidates’ Views on Abortion

One of the most contentious issues in American politics is abortion. McCain and Obama have very different views on this issue. McCain is firmly pro-life and has voted consistently against abortion rights. He has stated that he would only appoint Supreme Court justices who would overturn Roe v Wade, the landmark case that legalized abortion in America. Obama, on the other hand, is pro-choice and has voted in favor of abortion rights. He has said that he would not seek to overturn Roe v Wade but would instead try to reduce the number of abortions through measures such as sex education and access to contraception. It is clear that McCain’s views on abortion are much more conservative than Obama’s, and this could alienate some voters who are in favor of abortion rights.

3. The Candidates’ Views on Global Warming

Another major issue facing America today is global warming. McCain has acknowledged the reality of human-induced climate change and has proposed a cap-and-trade system to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. He has also said that he would invest $2 billion per year in clean energy technologies. Obama also believes in human-induced climate change and has proposed a cap-and-trade system similar to McCain’s. However, he has said that he would invest $150 billion over 10 years in clean energy technologies. It is clear that both candidates believe in taking action on global warming, but Obama’s plan is much more ambitious than McCain’s. This could be seen as a positive by those who believe that more needs to be done to combat climate change, but it could also be seen as a negative by those who worry about the cost of implementing such a plan.

4. The Candidates’ Views on Clean Technology

Investing in clean technology is one way of combatting climate change, but it is also seen as an important step towards reducing America’s dependence on foreign oil. McCain has said that he wants to invest $2 billion per year in clean energy technologies, including nuclear power, solar power, and wind power. He has also said that he wants to build 45 new nuclear power plants by 2030. Obama has also said that he wants to invest $150 billion over 10 years in clean energy technologies. However, he has been less specific about which technologies he wants to invest in. It is clear that both candidates see clean technology as important, but McCain’s plan is significantly more ambitious than Obama’s. This could be seen as a positive by those who want America to take a leading role in developing clean technologies, but it could also be seen as a negative by those who worry about the cost of implementing such a plan.

5. The Candidates’ Views on Taxes

Taxes are another contentious issue in American politics. McCain has promised to keep George W. Bush’s tax cuts for the wealthy, which were enacted in 2001 and 2003. He has also said that he would eliminate the estate tax. Obama has promised to roll back the Bush tax cuts for the wealthy and has also said that he would increase taxes on capital gains and dividends. It is clear that McCain’s tax plan is much more favorable to the wealthy than Obama’s, and this could alienate some voters who believe that the wealthy should pay more in taxes.

6. Conclusion

In conclusion, it is clear that McCain and Obama have very different views on some of the major issues facing America today. These differences could make it difficult for voters to choose between the two candidates. However, it is also clear that both candidates have a lot to offer America. McCain’s experience and Obama’s vision could both be seen as positive attributes. Ultimately, it is up to the voters to decide which candidate they believe would be best for America.

FAQ

The main differences between Obama and McCain as presidential candidates are their respective political philosophies and foreign policy experience.

Obama is a liberal Democrat while McCain is a conservative Republican.

Obama's key domestic policy proposals include healthcare reform, tax cuts for the middle class, and investment in alternative energy sources. McCain's key domestic policy proposals include tax cuts for businesses and individuals, an increase in offshore drilling, and privatization of Social Security.

Obama opposes the Iraq War and has called for a withdrawal of troops within 16 months of taking office. McCain supports the war and has said that he would "surge" troops in order to achieve victory.

Obama has proposed a $75 billion economic stimulus package that includes tax breaks for businesses and low-income families, increased spending on infrastructure projects, and assistance to states facing budget shortfalls. McCain has proposed a $52 billion economic stimulus package that includes across-the-board tax cuts and increased spending on defense projects.

Obama served on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee before becoming president, while McCain has spent more than two decades in the Senate Armed Services Committee. Both candidates have traveled extensively throughout their careers but have limited executive experience dealing with foreign policy issues.

I believe that Obama would be a better president because I agree with his policies on taxes, healthcare, energy, and the war in Iraq. I also think he would be better equipped to handle future foreign policy challenges given his experience on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee."