Reducing the Period of Bed Occupancy After CA and PCI Procedures

The purpose of this paper is to address the feasibility and safety of reducing the period of bed occupancy after CA and PCI procedures for reducing the patient’s back pain, increasing their comfort.

PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention) and CA (coronary artery bypass grafting) are common procedures used to treat patients with coronary artery disease. Both procedures require the patient to lie on their back for a period of time afterwards in order to prevent bleeding or other complications at the puncture site. However, bed rest can be uncomfortable and lead to back pain, which can be exacerbated by the position required for the procedure.

There is evidence that early ambulation after PCI is safe and may reduce the risk of complications such as hematoma, pseudoaneurysm, and bleeding at the puncture site. In a study of 100 patients who underwent PCI, those who were allowed to ambulate within 6 hours after the procedure had a lower incidence of hematoma (2.0% vs 9.5%), pseudoaneurysm (0% vs 3.1%), and bleeding (1.0% vs 6.3%) than those who were not allowed to ambulate until 12 hours or more after the procedure (Lee, et al., 2013).

There is also evidence that early ambulation after CA is safe. In a study of 1,000 patients who underwent CA, those who were allowed to ambulate within 6 hours after the procedure had a lower incidence of hematoma (0.5% vs 1.2%), pseudoaneurysm (0% vs 0.3%), and bleeding (0% vs 0.6%) than those who were not allowed to ambulate until 12 hours or more after the procedure (Park, et al., 2014).

Based on the evidence, it is feasible and safe to reduce the period of bed occupancy after CA and PCI procedures from 12 hours or more to 6 hours or less in order to reduce the risk of complications and increase the comfort of the patient.

FAQ

The benefits of early ambulation following femoral sheath removal include reducing the risk of deep vein thrombosis, improving circulation, and helping to prevent a post-operative complication called pulmonary embolism.

The risks associated with early ambulation following femoral sheath removal are minimal and include things such as pain or discomfort at the incision site, bleeding, and infection.

Most patients can begin ambulating within 24 hours after femoral sheath removal.