Probation and Parole: What’s the Difference?

1. Introduction:

Probation and parole are both legal terms that are often confused with one another. Probation is a court-ordered sanction imposed on an offender after they have been found guilty of a crime, but have not been sent to prison. Parole, on the other hand, is a release from prison before the end of a sentence. In order for an offender to be eligible for parole, they must first serve a portion of their sentence in prison. There are many different factors that can contribute to an offender being placed on probation or parole. Some of these factors include the severity of the crime, the risk to public safety, and the offender’s criminal history.

2. What is probation?

Probation is a court-ordered sanction that is imposed on an offender after they have been found guilty of a crime, but have not been sent to prison. The purpose of probation is to allow offenders to remain in the community while they receive rehabilitative services and supervision. Probation is typically used for less serious offenses and for first-time offenders. Offenders who are placed on probation are required to comply with certain conditions, such as meeting with a probation officer on a regular basis, completing community service hours, and attending counseling sessions. If an offender violates the terms of their probation, they may be required to appear before a judge for a hearing. At this hearing, the judge may decide to revoke the offender’s probation and order them to serve their sentence in prison.

3. What is parole?

Parole is a release from prison before the end of a sentence. In order for an offender to be eligible for parole, they must first serve a portion of their sentence in prison. The length of time that an offender must serve before they are eligible for parole varies from state to state. For example, in New York State, an offender must serve at least one-third of their sentence before they are eligible for parole consideration (New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, 2016). Parole boards are responsible for determining whether or not an offender should be released on parole. When making this decision, parole boards consider many different factors, such as the severity of the offense, the risk to public safety, and the offender’s criminal history. If an offender is released on parole, they are required to comply with certain conditions, such as meeting with a parole officer on a regular basis and attending counseling sessions. If an offender violates the terms of their parole, they may be required to appear before a judge for a hearing. At this hearing, the judge may decide to revoke the offender’s parole and order them to serve out their sentence in prison.

4. Causes of probation and parole:

There are many different factors that can contribute to an offender being placed on probation or parole. Some of these factors include the severity of the crime, the risk to public safety, and the offender’s criminal history. Other factors that may be considered include the age of the victim, whether or not a weapon was used during the commission of the crime, and whether or not the victim was injured during the commission of the crime.
5 Factors that may be considered by the parole board: decks consider many facts when making decisions about whether or not offenders should be granted probation or parole release including but not limited too: The seriousness/severity of the offense
The inmate’s criminal history
The age of the victim
The use of a weapon during the commission of the offense
Whether or not the victim was injured during the commission of the offense. but are also known to heavily rely on The discretion of the judge
Personal/professional recommendations If an offender is deemed high-risk, they may be less likely to be granted probation or parole. Factors that would make an offender appear to be high-risk include a history of violence, a history of drug abuse, and a history of fleeing from law enforcement.

6. Conclusion:

Probation and parole are both legal terms that are often confused with one another. Probation is a court-ordered sanction imposed on an offender after they have been found guilty of a crime, but have not been sent to prison. Parole, on the other hand, is a release from prison before the end of a sentence. There are many different factors that can contribute to an offender being placed on probation or parole. Some of these factors include the severity of the crime, the risk to public safety, and the offender’s criminal history.

FAQ

The main causes of probation and parole are crime and criminal justice.

The main factors that contribute to probation and parole are the severity of the offense, the offender's criminal history, the victim's impact statement, and the recommendations of the probation officer.

Probation and parole have a significant impact on offenders. They are often required to comply with strict conditions, which can include regular meetings with a probation officer, drug testing, community service, and attending counseling or treatment programs. Violating any of these conditions can result in being sent back to jail or prison.

Victims also feel the impacts of probation and parole. In some cases, they may be required to meet with the offender as part of their sentence or participate in victim-offender mediation sessions. They may also be notified if the offender is going to be released from custody or transferred to another facility.

The implications of probation and parole on society as a whole are both positive and negative. On one hand, it can provide offenders with an opportunity to reform and reintegrate into society after paying their debt to it. On the other hand, it can place a financial burden on taxpayers for things like supervision costs and housing inmates in halfway houses or other facilities instead of prisons