Pico’s View of Man: Angelic or Brutish?

1. Introduction

Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola (1463-1494) was an Italian humanist, philosopher and theologian. His thought was influenced by Neo-Platonism and Aristotelianism. Pico is best known for his work, “On the Dignity of Man”, in which he urges that man is a free being because he has many gods within him and can choose whatever he wills. Some men turn out to be plants, others become brutish and others – angelic.

Pico’s view of man as a free being was controversial in his time. His ideas were condemned by the Church and he was excommunicated. Pico’s nine hundred theses were debated by theologians and philosophers, including Alexander VI, Pope Alexander VI’s son Cesare Borgia, and Giuliano della Rovere (later Pope Julius II). The debate of Pico’s nine hundred theses is sometimes seen as a watershed moment in the development of Renaissance thought.

2. Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola: angelic or brutish?

In “On the Dignity of Man”, Pico argues that man is a free being because he has many gods within him and can choose whatever he wills. Some men turn out to be plants, others become brutish and others – angelic.

Pico’s view of man as a free being was controversial in his time. His ideas were condemned by the Church and he was excommunicated. Pico’s nine hundred theses were debated by theologians and philosophers, including Alexander VI, Pope Alexander VI’s son Cesare Borgia, and Giuliano della Rovere (later Pope Julius II). The debate of Pico’s nine hundred theses is sometimes seen as a watershed moment in the development of Renaissance thought.

3. Pico’s view of man as a free being

Pico argued that man is a free being because he has many gods within him and can choose whatever he wills. Some men turn out to be plants, others become brutish and others – angelic.

Pico’s view of man as a free being was controversial in his time. His ideas were condemned by the Church and he was excommunicated. Pico’s nine hundred theses were debated by theologians and philosophers, including Alexander VI, Pope Alexander VI’s son Cesare Borgia, and Giuliano della Rovere (later Pope Julius II). The debate of Pico’s nine hundred theses is sometimes seen as a watershed moment in the development of Renaissance thought.

4. Conclusion

Pico’s view of man as a free being was controversial in his time. His ideas were condemned by the Church and he was excommunicated. Pico’s nine hundred theses were debated by theologians and philosophers, including Alexander VI, Pope Alexander VI’s son Cesare Borgia, and Giuliano della Rovere (later Pope Julius II). The debate of Pico’s nine hundred theses is sometimes seen as a watershed moment in the development of Renaissance thought.

FAQ

Pico della Mirandola was inspired to write his essay on man after reading the works of Plato and Aristotle. He believed that man was a miraculous being because he had the ability to reason and make choices. Pico thought that man could attain true happiness by using his reason to choose wisely. However, he warned against overreaching ambition, as it could lead to disaster.

Pico della Mirandola believes that man is a miraculous being because he has the ability to reason and make choices.

Pico della Mirandola thinks that man can attain true happiness by using his reason to choose wisely.

Pico della Mirandola warns against overreaching ambition, as it could lead to disaster.