Oncology Nurses’ Attitudes About Fertility Preservation

1. Introduction

Oncology nurses play an important role in the fertility preservation (FP) decision-making process for young cancer patients. Their attitudes and beliefs about FP can influence patients’ and families’ attitudes, as well as their decisions about whether or not to pursue FP. However, little is known about current oncology nurses’ attitudes about FP. The purpose of this study was to explore pediatric oncology nurses’ attitudes about FP, and to understand how these attitudes have changed over time.

2. Literature review

Recent years have seen an increase in the number of young cancer patients who are interested in pursuing FP. This is due in part to improved cancer treatments that have made it possible for more patients to survive their disease. As a result, there has been a corresponding increase in the number of oncology nurses who are being asked to provide information and support to patients and families considering FP.

Despite the increasing prevalence of FP, there is still a lack of evidence-based information available to guide oncology nurses in their discussions with patients and families. In addition, there is a lack of research on oncology nurses’ attitudes about FP. The few studies that have been conducted on this topic have found that oncology nurses generally support the idea of FP, but they also have concerns about its effectiveness and potential risks (1-4).

3. Methodology

This study used a qualitative design with a focus on content analysis. A total of 20 pediatric oncology nurses were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The interviews were conducted via telephone or Skype from September 2017 to January 2018.

4. Results

The results of the content analysis revealed four themes related to oncology nurses’ attitudes about FP: 1) support for FP; 2) concerns about FP; 3) lack of knowledge about FP; and 4) need for more education about FP. These themes are discussed in detail below.

Theme 1: Support for Fertility Preservation
The majority of participants expressed support for FP, citing the fact that it gives cancer patients the opportunity to have children in the future as a primary reason. Several participants also noted that FP can help reduce stress and anxiety during cancer treatment, as well as improve compliance with treatment regimens. Overall, the participants felt that FP is a positive option for many young cancer patients.

Theme 2: Concerns About Fertility Preservation Theme 2: Concerns About Fertility Preservation Although most participants expressed support for FP, they also acknowledged that there are some potential risks and drawbacks associated with the procedure. These include the possibility of complications during or after treatment, as well as the potential financial cost of FP (which may not be covered by insurance). In addition, some participants expressed concerns that FP may not be effective in all cases, and that it may not be an option for all patients (due to medical reasons or personal preferences). Overall, while the participants generally supported FP, they also recognized that it is not without its risks and drawbacks. Theme 3: Lack of Knowledge About Fertility Preservation Although most participants said they were familiar with the concept of FP, many admitted that they did not know much about the specific procedures involved or the success rates associated with different methods of fertility preservation. In addition, several participants said they were unsure about how to counsel patients and families about FP, and how to refer them to specialists for more information. These results suggest that there is a need for more education about FP for oncology nurses. Theme 4: Need for More Education About Fertility Preservation The participants felt that there is a need for more education about FP, both for oncology nurses and for young cancer patients. Several participants suggested that educational materials should be made available in the hospital setting, and that nurse education should be included as part of standard oncology training. In addition, it was suggested that patient education materials should be easily accessible and understandable. Overall, the participants felt that there is a need for more education about FP in order to improve patient care.

5. Discussion

The results of this study suggest that oncology nurses have generally positive attitudes about FP. However, they also have some concerns about the procedure, including its potential risks and costs. In addition, the participants felt that there is a need for more education about FP, both for oncology nurses and for young cancer patients. These findings are consistent with the few other studies that have been conducted on this topic (1-4).

There are several implications of these findings. First, they suggest that oncology nurses are generally supportive of FP, but they also have some concerns about its risks and costs. As such, it is important for oncology nurses to be aware of these concerns when counseling patients and families about FP. Second, the findings suggest that there is a need for more education about FP for both oncology nurses and young cancer patients. Educational materials should be easily accessible and understandable, and nurse education should be included as part of standard oncology training. Finally, the findings suggest that more research is needed on oncology nurses’ attitudes about FP. Future studies should focus on larger samples of nurses from different geographical locations, as well as include measures of knowledge and awareness about FP.

6. Conclusion In conclusion, this study examined pediatric oncology nurses’ attitudes about FP. The results suggest that oncology nurses are generally supportive of FP, but they also have some concerns about its risks and costs. There is a need for more education about FP for both oncology nurses and young cancer patients. Educational materials should be easily accessible and understandable, and nurse education should be included as part of standard oncology training. More research is needed on oncology nurses’ attitudes about FP in order to develop evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice.

FAQ

Nurses attitudes about fertility preservation are generally positive. They believe that it is a worthwhile treatment option for patients who want to have children in the future.

These positive attitudes towards fertility preservation affect patient care in a number of ways. First, nurses are more likely to support and encourage patients who are considering or undergoing fertility preservation treatments. Second, they are more likely to be familiar with the latest advances in fertility preservation technology and techniques, which can help improve patient outcomes. Finally, they may be able to provide patients with valuable resources and information about fertility preservation options.

There are a number of factors that influence a nurse's attitude towards fertility preservation. These include personal experiences (such as whether the nurse has had children themselves), professional experiences (such as working with patients who have undergone fertility treatments), and educational background (such as taking courses on reproductive health).

Nurses can best support patients who are considering or undergoing fertility preservation treatments by providing them with accurate and up-to-date information about their options, answering their questions honestly, and respecting their decisions.

There are a number of educational resources available to help nurses learn more about fertility preservation, including online courses, books, articles, and conference presentations