Nuclear Proliferation: A Comparison of Paul’s and Mozley’s Books

1. Introduction

The discovery of nuclear fission and the subsequent development of nuclear weapons technology during the course of the Second World War led to a new era in international relations. The potential destructive power of these weapons of mass destruction (WMD) was such that their very existence had a profound impact on the way states thought about and conducted warfare. In the aftermath of the war, as the nuclear arms race got underway, it became apparent that the proliferation of nuclear weapons would have serious implications for global security.

The issue of nuclear proliferation has been a major concern of policymakers and scholars for many years and there is a large body of literature on the subject. In this essay, I will compare and contrast two books that deal with the issue of nuclear proliferation: Paul’s The Tradition of Non-Use of Nuclear Weapons and Mozley’s The politics and technology of nuclear proliferation. I will argue that while both books offer valuable insights into the phenomenon of nuclear proliferation, they differ in their approach to the subject.

2. Overview of Books

2.1 The Tradition of Non-Use of Nuclear Weapons by Paul

In his book The Tradition of Non-Use of Nuclear Weapons, Paul argues that there is a tradition of non-use of nuclear weapons which has developed over time and which serves as a constraint on their use. He traces the origins of this tradition back to the use of atomic bombs against Japan in 1945 and argues that it has been strengthened by a number of international treaties, including the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

Paul’s book is primarily concerned with the normative aspects of the non-use tradition and he pays relatively little attention to the role played by technical factors in constraining nuclear weapon use. He does, however, acknowledge that technical factors such as early warning systems and counterforce capabilities play a role in deterring nuclear weapon use.

2. 2 The politics and technology of nuclear proliferation by Mozley

In his book The politics and technology of nuclear proliferation, Robert Fred Mozley takes a different approach to the issue of nuclear proliferation. Unlike Paul, he does not believe that there is a tradition of non-use which serves as a constraint on the use of nuclear weapons. Instead, he argues that Proliferation only became an issue after 1945 because previous international agreements had failed to take into account advances in nuclear technology.

Mozley’s book is primarily concerned with the technical aspects of nuclear proliferation and he pays relatively little attention to the normative aspects. He does, however, acknowledge that international norms play a role in constraining proliferation by making it difficult for states to develop or acquire nuclear weapons.

3. Paul’s and Mozley’s Books: A Comparison

As we have seen, Paul’s and Mozley’s books differ in their approach to the issue of nuclear proliferation. While Paul focuses on the normative aspects and argues that there is a tradition of non-use which serves as a constraint on nuclear weapon use, Mozley focuses on the technical aspects and argues that Proliferation only became an issue after 1945 because previous international agreements had failed to take into account advances in nuclear technology.

Despite these differences, both books offer valuable insights into the phenomenon of nuclear proliferation. Paul’s book provides a detailed history of the development of the non-use tradition and Mozley’s book provides a detailed analysis of the technical factors involved in nuclear proliferation.

4. Conclusion

In conclusion, Paul’s and Mozley’s books offer different but complementary perspectives on the issue of nuclear proliferation. While Paul focuses on the normative aspects of the issue, Mozley focuses on the technical aspects. Both books provide valuable insights into the phenomenon of nuclear proliferation and should be read in conjunction with each other to gain a fuller understanding of the issue.

FAQ

Nuclear proliferation is the spread of nuclear weapons, fissile material, and related technology.

Nuclear proliferation is a problem because it increases the risk of nuclear war and terrorist attacks.

Paul's book "Nuclear Proliferation: The Challenge of Compliance" focuses on the legal and political aspects of nuclear proliferation, while Mozley's book "Nuclear Weapons: The Road to Zero" looks at the history of nuclear weapons and disarmament efforts.

Paul concludes that international cooperation is essential to prevent nuclear proliferation, while Mozley argues that complete disarmament is the only way to eliminate the threat of nuclear war.