Managing ADHD and Asperger Syndrome in the Classroom

1. Introduction

Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) and Asperger Syndrome are neurological disorders that have become increasingly diagnosed in recent years. ADHD is a disorder that is characterized by impulsivity, hyperactivity, and inattention. Asperger Syndrome is a disorder that is characterized by social deficits and repetitive behaviors. Both of these disorders can be very disruptive to a classroom setting. This paper will explore the disruptive behaviors of ADHD and Asperger Syndrome students and how teachers can deal with them.

2. Defining ADHD and Asperger Syndrome

ADHD is a neurological disorder that is characterized by impulsivity, hyperactivity, and inattention (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Impulsivity is when a person acts without thinking or has difficulty waiting their turn. Hyperactivity is when a person is always moving or has difficulty sitting still. Inattention is when a person has difficulty paying attention or focusing on tasks. ADHD can be very disruptive to a classroom setting because it can make it difficult for the child to sit still, pay attention, or follow directions.

Asperger Syndrome is a neurological disorder that is characterized by social deficits and repetitive behaviors (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Social deficits are when a person has difficulty understanding social cues or interacting with others. Repetitive behaviors are when a person performs the same behavior over and over again or has restricted interests. Asperger Syndrome can be very disruptive to a classroom setting because the child may not understand social cues or may have trouble interacting with other students.

3. Sensory Perception Issues in Autism and Asperger Syndrome

Many children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have sensory processing issues (Smith, 2011). Sensory processing issues are when the brain has difficulty processing information from the senses. This can make it difficult for the child to filter out background noise, pay attention to the teacher, or sit still in their seat. Sensory processing issues can be very disruptive to a classroom setting.

4. Teacher Management of Students with ADHD and Asperger Syndrome

There are several things that teachers can do to manage students with ADHD and Asperger Syndrome in the classroom (Cook & Hussey, 2009). First, it is important to provide structure and routine in the classroom. This means having a set schedule for activities and transitions throughout the day. It is also important to provide clear instructions and directions for classwork and assignments. It is also important to give frequent reminders and encouragement throughout the day. Finally, it is important to offer positive reinforcement for good behavior and progress made throughout the day.

5. Rewards for Good Behavior

One way to encourage good behavior in students with ADHD and Asperger Syndrome is to offer rewards for good behavior (Cook & Hussey, 2009).Rewards can be given for following directions, completing tasks, or showing improvement throughout the day. Rewards can be given verbally, such as praising the student, or they can be given physically, such as giving the student a sticker or prize. It is important to choose rewards that are motivating for the student and that are given frequently enough to encourage good behavior.

6. Breakdowns in Class

There will be times when students with ADHD and Asperger Syndrome have breakdowns in class (Cook & Hussey, 2009). When this happens, it is important to remain calm and calm the student down. It is also important to provide the student with a break from the activity that is causing the breakdown. Finally, it is important to provide the student with a positive way to cope with the situation.

7. Conclusion

ADHD and Asperger Syndrome are neurological disorders that can be very disruptive to a classroom setting. However, there are several things that teachers can do to manage these disorders in the classroom. By providing structure, clear instructions, and positive reinforcement, teachers can help students with ADHD and Asperger Syndrome succeed in the classroom.

FAQ

The most common disruptive behaviors associated with ADHD and Asperger Syndrome are impulsivity, hyperactivity, inattention, and meltdowns.

These behaviors often occur in students with ADHD and Asperger Syndrome because they have difficulty regulating their emotions and processing information.

Teachers can effectively deal with disruptive behavior in the classroom by using positive reinforcement, clear rules and expectations, visual supports, and strategies to help the student stay on task.

Strategies that can be used to prevent or reduce disruptive behavior from occurring include providing structure and routine, breaking tasks down into smaller steps, using visual supports, and teaching self-regulation skills.

If a student exhibits persistent or severe disruptive behavior, it is important to consult with a professional to determine the best course of action.

Parents can support their child’s education when dealing with disruptive behaviors at school by staying involved in their child’s education, communicating with the school staff, and advocating for their child’s needs.

The potential long-term effects of not adequately addressing disruptive behavior in students with ADHD and Asperger Syndrome include academic difficulties, social problems, and emotional difficulties.