Information Literacy: What It Is and Why It Matters

1. Introduction

In recent years, the term “information literacy” has been used with a variety of different meanings. In general, however, it can be described as the ability to access, evaluate and use information effectively (Fisher, 2006). Information literacy is a crucial life skill in the modern world and one which is becoming increasingly important in the field of education. As technology advances and the amount of information available online continues to grow, it is essential that students are taught how to navigate the digital landscape and find the information they need in a safe and ethical manner.

This paper will explore the concept of information literacy in detail, with a particular focus on its relevance to teaching and professional development. It will begin by considering what information literacy actually is and how it can be defined. It will then go on to discuss the importance of technology, the library and online resources in relation to information literacy. After that, the paper will touch on some of the ethical issues involved in research and information gathering, before concluding with a discussion of some of the key skills associated with information literacy, such as critical thinking, reading and writing.

2. What is information literacy?

As previously mentioned, there is no one definitive answer to this question. However, the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) has developed a set of standards which offer a useful framework for thinking about information literacy (ACRL, 2016). These standards are organized into five core areas:

– Foundational knowledge: This refers to the basic concepts and principles related to information literacy
– Inquiry: The ability to identify and formulate questions based on need or curiosity
– Research: The process of finding, evaluating and using sources of information
– Scholarship: The ability to create new knowledge through synthesis, analysis and interpretation
– Engagement: The ability to participate in public discourse and contribute to one’s community

Each of these areas contains a number of more specific subcategories. For example, under the heading of “foundational knowledge”, students are expected to understand concepts such as authority, credibility and copyright. Under “inquiry”, they should be able to develop search strategies and select appropriate search tools. And under “research”, they should be able to locate sources of information, critically evaluate them and properly cite them in their work.

3. The process of identifying the kind of information that is needed

One of the most important aspects of information literacy is the ability to identify the kind of information that is needed for a particular purpose. This involves understanding how different types of sources can be used to answer different types of questions. For example, if a student wants to find out about a historical event, they would need to use different sources than if they were looking for statistical data about a current issue. Types of sources that might be used include books, articles, websites, databases, primary sources and secondary sources.

4. Technology and information literacy

In today’s digital world, it is impossible to overstate the importance of technology in relation to information literacy. Students need to be able to use technology not only to access information but also to evaluate it and create new knowledge. One way in which technology can be used for this purpose is through online research. With just a few clicks, students can now access a vast array of digital resources which were previously only available in libraries. However, it is important to teach students how to critically evaluate the information they find online, as not all sources are equally reliable or accurate.

5. The library and information literacy

Although technology has made it easier than ever to access information, libraries still have an important role to play in terms of information literacy. Libraries can be seen as gateways to knowledge, offering users a curated selection of resources which have been carefully chosen to meet their needs. They also provide a physical space for learning and collaboration, and they offer expert staff who can help users to find the information they need. In short, libraries remain an essential part of the information landscape, even in the digital age.

6. Online resources and information literacy

In addition to libraries, there are many other online resources that can be used for information literacy. These include databases, websites, blogs, social media and more. It is important to teach students how to evaluate these sources in terms of reliability and accuracy. They should also be aware of the potential pitfalls of using such sources, such as plagiarism and copyright infringement.

7. Research and information literacy

Research is another important aspect of information literacy. Students need to be able to understand the research process and know how to locate, evaluate and use sources effectively. They should also be aware of the ethical issues involved in research, such as plagiarism and confidential data.

8. Plagiarism and ethical issues in information literacy

Plagiarism is a major concern in education today, and it is one of the most important ethical issues to be aware of in relation to information literacy. Plagiarism occurs when someone uses someone else’s work without giving credit, or when they use their own work that has been previously published without disclosing this fact. It can have serious consequences, both academically and professionally. That is why it is so important to teach students about plagiarism and how to avoid it.

9. Critical thinking and reading in information literacy

Critical thinking is another key skill associated with information literacy. Students need to be able to think critically about the sources they use and the claims they make. This means being able to question assumptions, identify bias and look at evidence in a nuanced way. Reading is also an important part of critical thinking; students need to be able to read texts carefully and critically in order to understand them fully.

10. Writing and media in information literacy

Writing is another key skill that students need in order to be information literate. They should be able to communicate their ideas clearly and concisely, using appropriate language for their audience and purpose. In addition, they should be aware of the different formats that writing can take, such as essays, reports, infographics and blog posts. Media literacy is also important; students should be able to understand and critically analyze different types of media, such as television, film, advertising and social media.11. Conclusion
In conclusion, it is clear that information literacy is a complex and multidimensional concept. It is not simply about finding information; it is also about understanding how to access, evaluate and use information effectively. It is a crucial life skill in the modern world, and one which is becoming increasingly important in the field of education. As technology advances and the amount of information available online continues to grow, it is essential that students are taught how to navigate the digital landscape and find the information they need in a safe and ethical manner.

FAQ

Information literacy is the ability to read, write, and think critically about information. It is important for teachers because it helps them to be able to better understand and use information in their classrooms.

Teachers can develop their information literacy skills by attending workshops and seminars, reading professional development books, and using online resources.

Some ways that information literacy can be used in professional development for teachers include providing resources on how to find and evaluate sources of information, teaching research methods, and using technology in the classroom.