Global Warming: Using GIS to Understand Climate Change

1. Introduction

Global warming is the long-term rise in the average temperature of the Earth’s climate system. It is a major aspect of climate change, and has been demonstrated by the instrumental temperature record which shows global surface temperature increased by 0.74 ± 0.18 °C over the period 1906–2005. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concludes “most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the observed increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations” via a strong scientific consensus. Greenhouse gases trapped heat energy in the Earth’s atmosphere causing Earth’s average temperature to rise. The main greenhouse gases involved are water vapor, carbon dioxide, ozone, nitrous oxide and methane. Another cause of global warming is solar variation like Milankovitch cycles. The periodicity of these variations is well known, but their amplitude is too small to cause climate change on anything more than a regional scale and over periods shorter than tens of thousands of years without amplification by another factor such as changed atmospheric composition. Solar variation can explain some recent regional climate changes but cannot explain global warming. GIS can be used to track these changes in our climate and help us better understand what is happening to our planet.

2. Methods

There are many ways to approach this problem and GIS can be used in a variety of ways to help us better understand global warming and its effects on the planet. We can use GIS to create maps that show how the Earth’s climate has changed over time and how it is expected to change in the future. We can also use GIS to analyze data from weather stations around the world to look for patterns and trends that may be indicative of global warming. Additionally, we can use GIS to create models that simulate how different greenhouse gases affect the Earth’s climate.

3. Results
Method A

One way we can use GIS to study global warming is by creating maps that show how the Earth’s climate has changed over time. This can be done by tracking changes in temperature, precipitation, sea level, ice extent, etc. over time. By looking at these maps, we can get a better understanding of how global warming is affecting different parts of the world and what regions are most vulnerable to its effects. Additionally, these maps can be used to predict how the Earth’s climate will change in the future as greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase.

Method B
Another way we can use GIS to study global warming is by analyzing data from weather stations around the world. This data can be used to look for patterns and trends that may be indicative of global warming. For example, we can look at changes in temperature over time or compare temperatures between different regions of the world. Additionally, this data can be used to create models that simulate how different greenhouse gases affect the Earth’s climate. By doing this, we can better understand how global warming works and what we can do to mitigate its effects.

4. Discussion and Conclusion

Global warming is a complex problem that requires a comprehensive understanding of the Earth’s climate system. GIS can be a valuable tool in studying global warming and its effects on the planet. By creating maps and analyzing data, we can better understand how global warming is affecting different parts of the world and what we can do to mitigate its effects.

FAQ

GIS is a Geographic Information System. It can be used to study global warming by tracking changes in the Earth's climate over time.

Global warming can cause the Earth to heat up, which can lead to drastic changes in weather patterns and an increase in natural disasters.

The main causes of global warming are human activities like burning fossil fuels and deforestation.

We can take action on global warming by reducing our greenhouse gas emissions and planting trees to help offset carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.

If we don't take action on global warming, it could lead to catastrophic consequences like rising sea levels, more extreme weather events, and mass extinctions of plant and animal species.