East-West Issues in Popular Literature: A Comparison of “Season of Migration to the North” and “Othello”

1. Introduction

The World Literature sector is full of excellent pieces of art. In this essay, I will be discussing two of them which are related to east-west issues in popular literature. The first one is “Season of Migration to the North” by Tayeb Salih and the second is “Othello” by Shakespeare. I have chosen these two because they are considered as masterpieces in the field of Orientalism and postcolonial culture.

2. “Season of Migration to the North” by Tayeb Salih

“Season of Migration to the North” is a novel written by Tayeb Salih in 1966. It is about a Sudanese man named Mustafa Sa’eed who goes to study in England and later returns to Sudan. The novel addresses the issue of Orientalism, which is a Eurocentric view of the East. It also explores the theme of Racism, which is an important issue in postcolonial culture.

3. “Othello” by Shakespeare

“Othello” is a play written by Shakespeare in 1603. It is about a Moorish general named Othello who is married to Desdemona, a Venetian noblewoman. The play addresses the issue of Racism, which is an important issue in postcolonial culture. It also explores the theme of jealousy, which is a universal human emotion.

4. Conclusion

In conclusion, both “Season of Migration to the North” and “Othello” are excellent pieces of art that deal with east-west issues in popular literature. They are both masterpieces in the field of Orientalism and postcolonial culture.

FAQ

Both "Season of Migration to the North" and "Othello" explore the theme of identity, though in different ways. In "Season of Migration to the North", Salih tells the story of a man who leaves his home in Sudan to study in Europe, and eventually returns to Sudan. The novel focuses on the idea of identity as it relates to place and belonging. Shakespeare's "Othello", on the other hand, is a tragedy about a man who is consumed by jealousy and ultimately destroys himself. While both works deal with questions of identity, they approach them from different angles.

Each work depicts the experience of migrants and their relationships with those who remain in their home countries differently. In "Season of Migration to the North", Salih portrays the experience of migration as something that can be both positive and negative. The protagonist leaves Sudan for Europe, where he has many adventures and experiences new things. However, he also feels alienated from his new surroundings and longs for his homeland. Shakespeare's "Othello", on the other hand, focuses on the destructive power of jealousy. Othello is an outsider in Venice, and his relationship with Desdemona is fraught with tension from the beginning. As Othello becomes more consumed by jealousy, he starts to see everyone around him as enemies, leading to his downfall.

Women play different roles in each text, but they are generally portrayed negatively. In "Season of Migration to the North", women are shown as temptresses who lure men away from their homes and cause them harm. The protagonist's first wife is described as a beautiful but dangerous woman who leads him astray; she eventually dies after causing him great pain (both physical and emotional). Desdemona is also presented somewhat negatively in "Othello"; while she is not explicitly shown as being responsible for Othello's downfall, her innocence makes her powerless against Iago's machinations.

Salih's and Shakespeare's works reflect different Western conceptions of Africa and Africans. "Season of Migration to the North" challenges many of the stereotypes about Africa that were common in the West at the time it was written. The novel presents a complex picture of Sudan and its people, depicting them as fully rounded human beings with their own hopes, dreams, and desires. "Othello", on the other hand, largely reinforces negative stereotypes about Africa and Africans. Othello is presented as an animalistic figure who is controlled by his emotions; he is also shown to be physically violent and sexually aggressive.