Different approaches to immigration in Canada and Australia: a comparison

1. Introduction

In recent years, immigration has become a hot topic in many countries. This is especially true in developed countries, which have seen an influx of immigrants from developing countries. Canada and Australia are two such countries. Both countries have experienced rapid economic growth in recent years, and both have been major destinations for immigrants.

Despite the similarities in the immigration policies of Canada and Australia, there was a great difference in how the refugees were treated. In the 1970s and 1980s, Canada welcomed Vietnamese refugees with open arms, while Australia implemented a policy of mandatory detention for all refugees. This essay will explore the different approaches to immigration taken by Canada and Australia, and the reasons for the different treatment of refugees.

2. Immigration policies in Canada and Australia

a. Removal of restrictions in the 1960s
Both Canada and Australia have had a long history of restricting immigration. However, in the 1960s, both countries began to remove some of these restrictions. In 1966, Canada eliminated its discriminatory “head tax” on Chinese immigrants. In 1967, it adopted a new points-based system for selecting immigrants, which gave preference to those with skills that were in demand in Canada. The following year, Australia eliminated its own discriminatory “White Australia” policy, which had restricted non-white immigration since 1901.

These changes were part of a broader trend towards more open immigration policies in developed countries. They were also prompted by changing demographics: as the populations of developed countries began to age, they needed more young workers to maintain their economies. Canada and Australia were no exception to this trend.

b. Re-establishment of discriminatory restrictions
In the 1980s and 1990s, however, both Canada and Australia began to re-establish some of the discriminatory restrictions that they had removed in the 1960s. In 1982, Canada implemented a new set of rules that limited family reunification to immediate family members only ( spouses, children under 18 years old, and parents over 65 years old). In 1987, it introduced a new “landing fee” for all immigrants, which effectively priced out many potential immigrants who could not afford it. And in 1993, it introduced a new set of rules that made it much harder for refugees to claim asylum in Canada.

Australia followed a similar path. In 1989, it introduced a new policy of mandatory detention for all refugees who arrived without a visa. This policy was widely criticized by human rights groups, but it remained in place until 1992. In 2001, following the 9/11 attacks in the United States, Australia reintroduced mandatory detention for all refugees arriving by boat. This policy remains in place today.

c. Multiculturalism
In 1971, Canada became the first country in the world to adopt an official policy of multiculturalism. This policy recognized the right of all Canadians to maintain their cultural identity, and promoted diversity as a strength of Canadian society. The following year, Australia adopted its own policy of multiculturalism. This policy was designed to promote harmony between different cultural groups within Australian society.

3. Refugee crisis in Southeast Asia

In the 1970s and 1980s, Southeast Asia was engulfed in a series of wars that led to the mass displacement of millions of people. These wars included the Vietnam War (1964-1975), the Cambodian Civil War (1970-1975), and the Laotian Civil War (1959-1975).

a. The Vietnamese Boat People
The largest group of refugees was the Vietnamese Boat People. These were people who fled Vietnam by boat after the Communist victory in the Vietnam War in 1975. Most of them were ethnic Chinese, who were persecuted by the Communist government.

Between 1975 and 1979, an estimated half a million Vietnamese Boat People fled to Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Many of them later settled in Australia, Canada, and the United States.

b. The Boat People of Cambodia and Laos
Another group of refugees was the Boat People of Cambodia and Laos. These were people who fled Cambodia and Laos by boat after the Communist victory in the Cambodian Civil War in 1975 and the Laotian Civil War in 1959. Most of them were ethnic Vietnamese, who were persecuted by the Communist governments.

Between 1975 and 1979, an estimated 200,000 Boat People of Cambodia and Laos fled to Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Many of them later settled in Australia, Canada, and the United States.

4. Conclusion

In conclusion, immigration has been a controversial issue in both Canada and Australia. Both countries have experienced rapid economic growth in recent years, and both have been major destinations for immigrants. However, there has been a great difference in how the refugees have been treated. In the 1970s and 1980s, Canada welcomed Vietnamese refugees with open arms, while Australia implemented a policy of mandatory detention for all refugees. This essay has explored the different approaches to immigration taken by Canada and Australia, and the reasons for the different treatment of refugees.

FAQ

The main differences between Asian immigrants in Canada and Australia are the following: -The number of Asian immigrants in Canada is much higher than in Australia -Asian immigrants in Canada are more likely to come from China, India, or the Philippines, while Asian immigrants in Australia are more likely to come from Vietnam, Malaysia, or Indonesia -The Canadian government has been generally more welcoming towards Asian immigrants than the Australian government

The similarities between Asian immigrants in Canada and Australia are the following: -Both countries have experienced a significant increase in the number of Asian immigrants in recent years -Many Asian immigrants face similar challenges when moving to either country, such as language barriers and discrimination

Immigration policies towards Asian immigrants have changed significantly in recent years in both Canada and Australia. In Canada, the government has implemented a series of measures to welcome and integrate newcomers from all backgrounds, including Asians. Meanwhile, Australia has become increasingly restrictive towards immigration overall, and this has had a negative impact on many potential Asian migrants who are seeking to start a new life Down Under.

Some common challenges that Asian immigrants face when moving to either country include language barriers, cultural adjustment issues, racism/discrimination, and difficulty finding employment. While some progress has been made in recent years to help address these problems, much more needs to be done in order to fully support newcomers from Asia as they settle into their new homes.

Overall, most experts agree that integration rates for Asians vary depending on factors such as length of time spent living in the host country and level of English proficiency. In general though, it is fair to say that many Asians struggle with integrating into mainstream society due largely to linguistic and cultural differences. 6. To improve the situation of Asians living in both countries , various stakeholders (including governments , business leaders , community organizations , etc .) need to work together proactively create opportunities for economic inclusion , social cohesion ,and intercultural understanding . ["The main differences between Asian immigrants in Canada and Australia are the countries' history, geography, and demographics. Canada has a longer history of immigration than Australia, and its population is more diverse. Additionally, Canada is a larger country with a more centralized government.","The similarities between Asian immigrants in Canada and Australia include the challenges they face when moving to either country. Both countries have experienced an influx of Asian immigrants in recent years, and both groups often face similar challenges such as language barriers, cultural adjustment, and discrimination.","Immigration policies in both countries have changed in recent years to become more welcoming of Asian immigrants. In particular, Canada has implemented a series of policies meant to better integrate newcomers into society. However, challenges still remain for both groups of immigrants.","Some of the challenges that Asian immigrants face when moving to either country include language barriers, cultural adjustment, and discrimination. Additionally, many Asian immigrants are not familiar with the legal systems or social welfare programs in their new countries, which can make it difficult to access services or find employment.","Asian immigrants are generally well-integrated into Canadian society but there is room for improvement in both countries. In particular, education and employment opportunities could be improved for Asian immigrants in order to help them fully participate in society"]