Bullying and Worker’s Harassment in the Workplace

1. Introduction

Bullying and worker’s harassment is a common problem in Western Australia, especially in the armed forces and among women. This problem can have a significant impact on the individual’s health, wellbeing and work performance. It is therefore important to be aware of the signs of bullying and worker’s harassment, and to know how to prevent and deal with it.

2. What is bullying?

Bullying is defined as repeated and unreasonable behaviour directed towards a person or group of people that creates a risk to their health and safety. It can take many forms, including physical, verbal, psychological, social or cyber bullying.

3. What is worker’s harassment?

Worker’s harassment is defined as any unwelcome or offensive behaviour that creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive working environment. It can include things like sexual harassment, racial vilification or discrimination against someone because of their gender identity, age or disability.

4. Common forms of bullying and worker’s harassment

Common forms of bullying and worker’s harassment include:

– Physical bullying: This includes things like hitting, kicking, shoving, pulling hair or threatening violence.
– Verbal bullying: This includes things like name-calling, teasing, put-downs or inappropriate comments about appearance.
– Psychological bullying: This includes things like isolating someone from friends or work colleagues, spreading rumours or making unkind comments about someone’s work performance.
– Social bullying: This includes things like excluding someone from social activities, making mean comments about them on social media or deliberately excluding them from work events.
– Cyber bullying: This includes sending abusive or threatening messages online, posting embarrassing photos or videos of someone without their consent, or creating fake profiles or websites to humiliate someone.

5. Who is most likely to experience bullying and worker’s harassment?

Bullying and worker’s harassment can happen to anyone, but there are some groups of people who are more likely to experience it, including:

– Women: Women are more likely to experience sexual harassment and discrimination at work.
– Young people: Young people are more likely to experience cyber bullying.
– LGBTQI+ people: LGBTQI+ people are more likely to experience homophobia, transphobia or other forms of discrimination.
– People with a disability: People with a disability are more likely to experience bullying and worker’s harassment because of their disability.
– Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are more likely to experience racial vilification.

6. The impact of bullying and worker’s harassment

The impact of bullying and worker’s harassment can be significant and long-lasting. It can lead to mental health problems such as anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It can also cause physical health problems, such as headaches, stomachaches or sleeplessness. Bullying and worker’s harassment can also affect someone’s work performance and their ability to do their job.

7. Preventing bullying and worker’s harassment

There are a number of things that employers can do to prevent bullying and worker’s harassment in the workplace, including:

– Developing a policy on bullying and worker’s harassment
– Providing training for managers and employees on what constitutes bullying and worker’s harassment, and how to deal with it
– Investigating any complaints of bullying or worker’s harassment promptly and fairly
– Support employees who have been bullied or harassed, by providing counseling or education programs

8. Conclusion nnWorkplace bullying and worker’s harassment is a serious problem in Western Australia that can have a significant impact on the health, wellbeing and work performance of those affected by it. It is therefore important to be aware of the signs of bullying andworker’s harassment, and to know how to prevent and deal with it.

FAQ

Bullying is repeated and unreasonable behaviour directed towards a worker or group of workers that creates a risk to health and safety. The consequences of bullying can include physical and psychological harm, absenteeism, reduced productivity, increased stress levels, and turnover.

Workplace bullying is relatively common in Western Australia. A 2015 survey found that one in five workers had experienced workplace bullying in the previous 12 months.

Workers who are most likely to be bullied at work are those who are perceived to be different from the majority, such as women, people from minority groups, and people with disabilities.

Types of behaviour that constitute workplace bullying include verbal abuse, threats, intimidation, humiliation, sarcasm, belittling comments, isolating someone from work-related activities, and setting unrealistic deadlines.

Workers can protect themselves from being bullied at work by knowing their rights under anti-bullying legislation and seeking support from their employer or union if they feel they are being bullied.

Employers have a legal obligation to take reasonable steps to prevent or address workplace bullying under anti-bullying legislation in Western Australia.

Other measures that can be taken to prevent or address workplace bullying include developing policies and procedures on how to deal with bullying complaints; providing training for managers and employees on what constitutes workplace bullying; and establishing an independent complaints process for employees who feel they have been bullied at work