Being and Becoming: A Brief Overview

1. Introduction

The concept of becoming and being has been instrumental in the understanding not only of life issues but also of some of the scientific procedures. The question of what it means to be something or to become something has been debated by many philosophers, with Socrates being one of the most vocal proponents of this theory. In this essay, I will briefly overview the philosophical theories on being and becoming, before discussing how these two concepts can help us understand scientific change and mathematical understanding. I will also argue that, contrary to popular belief, becoming is actually more important than being in unlocking the mystery of life.

2. Being and Becoming: A Brief Overview

The debate on being and becoming dates back to the time of Socrates, who argued that everything in the world was constantly changing and that there was no such thing as true being. This theory was later developed by Plato, who posited that there was a higher level of reality where everything exists in its perfect form. This higher level is known as the Theory of Forms. Aristotle disagreed with both Socrates and Plato, stating that while things do change, they also have an essence or a “nature” that remains constant. He believed that change is only possible if there is something which does not change, and this unchanging element is what he called “being”.

3. The Theory of Forms

Plato’s Theory of Forms holds that there is a higher level of reality where everything exists in its perfect form. This higher level is known as the “Forms”. Socrates believed that the Forms were ideas which were imprinted on our souls before we are born, and which we forget when we are born into the physical world. It is only through philosophical contemplation that we can remember the Forms and attain true knowledge. For example, when we see a chair in the physical world, we are only seeing a imperfect copy of the “ideal” chair which exists in the realm of Forms. Similarly, when we see a beautiful person, we are only seeing a imperfect copy of the “ideal” beauty which exists in the realm of Forms. It is only through philosophical contemplation that we can remember the Forms and attain true knowledge.

4. The Good as the Pivot of the Cosmos

Aristotle disagreed with both Socrates and Plato, stating that while things do change, they also have an essence or a “nature” that remains constant. He believed that change is only possible if there is something which does not change, and this unchanging element is what he called “being”. Aristotle further argued that all beings strive towards their own good, and that this good is what gives purpose to their lives. He believed that the cosmos itself was created for the sake of achieving goodness, and that everything in it was ordered around this goal. For example, Aristotle believed that the Sun existed so that plants could grow and provide food for animals; without the Sun, there would be no life on Earth. Similarly, he believed that human beings existed so that they couldReason and contemplate about justice; without human beings, there would be no one to uphold justice in society

5. Scientific Change and Mathematical Understanding: Becoming as a Key to Unlocking the Mystery of Life

In recent years, there has been a growing trend of using philosophy to understand some of the most complex issues in science. One such issue is that of scientific change. It is often said that scientific theories are “true for now”, but this does not mean that they will be true forever. In fact, it is precisely because our understanding of the world is constantly changing that we need philosophy to help us make sense of it all.

Mathematics is another area where philosophy can help us unlock some of its mysteries. The German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz once said that “philosophy is the science of necessary truths”. What he meant by this is that, unlike physics or biology, which deal with contingent truths (i.e. truths which could be different), mathematics deals with necessary truths (i.e. truths which cannot be different). This means that, in order to understand mathematics, we need to understand the nature of necessity itself. And this is where philosophy comes in.

6. Conclusion

In conclusion, I have briefly overviewed the philosophical theories on being and becoming, before discussing how these two concepts can help us understand scientific change and mathematical understanding. I have also argued that, contrary to popular belief, becoming is actually more important than being in unlocking the mystery of life.

FAQ

Being is the state of existence, while becoming is the process of coming into existence.

Philosophical theories of being and becoming help us understand reality by providing a framework for thinking about the nature of existence itself.

Some key ideas behind these theories include the idea that being is constant and unchanging, while becoming is a process of change; that being is an ultimate reality, while becoming is a lower-level reality; and that being is primary and essential, while becoming is secondary and contingent.

Key thinkers associated with these theories include Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Hegel, Heidegger, Sartre, and Deleuze.

These theories have evolved over time in response to challenges from other philosophical traditions (such as materialism and empiricism) as well as from within their own tradition (such as debates between different schools of thought).

Today, these theories face challenges from both scientific discoveries (such as the Big Bang theory) and from contemporary philosophers (such as those who advocate for a more process-oriented view of reality).

In terms of understanding being and becoming, we can continue to explore these philosophical theories in depth, looking at both their history and their current applications.