African Americans at Increased Risk for Blood Clots from Stents

1. Introduction

African-Americans are more likely to develop blood clots from stents compared to non-African-American patients, according to a new study.

The study, which was published in the journal Circulation, looked at the records of nearly 4,000 patients who underwent angioplasty (a procedure to open clogged heart arteries) between 2009 and 2013.

Of the patients, 1,330 were African-American and 2,545 were non-African-American.

All of the patients had drug-coated stents (metal mesh tubes that are used to prop open arteries) implanted during their angioplasty procedures.

2. Blood clot risk from stents seen in African-Americans

The researchers found that African-Americans were more than twice as likely as non-African-Americans to develop blood clots from their stents within one year of their procedures.

Overall, the rate of blood clot development was 5.4 percent among African-Americans and 2.4 percent among non-African-Americans.

When the researchers looked at specific subgroups of patients, they found that the risk of blood clot development was even higher among certain groups of African-Americans.
For example, the risk was nearly three times higher among African-American women compared to non-African-American women.

The researchers also found that the risk of blood clot development was higher among African-Americans who were younger than 60 years old, compared to those who were 60 years or older.

3. African Americans more likely to develop blood clots from stents

The findings suggest that African Americans are more likely to develop blood clots from stents because they are more likely to have certain risk factors that predispose them to clotting problems.
For example, African Americans are more likely to have high levels of inflammation and scar tissue formation around their stents, which can increase the risk of blood clot formation. In addition, African Americans are also more likely to have genetic variants that predispose them to clotting problems.

4. Conclusion

In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest that African Americans are at an increased risk for developing blood clots from stents compared to non-African Americans. This increased risk may be due to factors such as inflammation, scar tissue formation, and genetic predisposition.

FAQ

Stents are small tubes that are placed in the arteries to keep them open.

Stents work by keeping the arteries open so that blood can flow more easily through them. This helps to treat coronary artery disease.

There is a greater risk of blood clots in African-Americans who have stents placed because the stents can irritate the lining of the artery and cause a clot to form.

The consequences of having a blood clot form after placement of a stent include heart attack, stroke, and death.

Steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of blood clots in this population include aspirin therapy, anticoagulant therapy, and aggressive cholesterol lowering therapy.

The implications of this study for treatment and prevention of coronary artery disease in African-Americans are that aggressive measures should be taken to reduce the risk of blood clots forming after stent placement.