Addressing Discrimination in the Workplace: A Case Study

1. Introduction

In this report, we will be discussing the case of an employee who has been facing discrimination at her workplace. The employee, who we will refer to as “Ms. Jones”, has been employed at her current organization for over two years. She is currently the only African American employee in her department, and she has been the target of racial discrimination from her coworkers. This has resulted in a hostile work environment for Ms. Jones, and she has raised the issue with her supervisor on multiple occasions. To date, her supervisor has done nothing to address the situation.

2. Purpose of the report

The purpose of this report is to provide recommendations on how Ms. Jones can best address the discrimination she is facing at her workplace. We will first review the relevant literature on employer-employee rights and conflict resolution in the workplace. We will then analyze the research findings and provide specific recommendations for Ms. Jones based on our findings.

3. Literature review

In order to provide recommendations for Ms. Jones, we will review the relevant literature on employer-employee rights and conflict resolution in the workplace. We will begin with a discussion of employer-employee rights, as this will provide context for our discussion of conflict resolution in the workplace.

Employer-employee rights are governed by a variety of federal, state, and local laws. The most relevant federal law for our purposes is Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, n.d.). State and local laws may also prohibit discrimination in employment on the basis of other protected characteristics, such as age, disability, or sexual orientation (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, n.d.).

Title VII applies to all employers with 15 or more employees, and it prohibits discrimination in all aspects of employment, including hiring, firing, promotions, pay, benefits, and job assignments (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, n.d.). Additionally, Title VII requires employers to provide a workplace free from harassment on the basis of a protected characteristic (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, n.d.).

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is the federal agency responsible for enforcing Title VII and other anti-discrimination laws (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, n.d.). Employees who believe they have been the victims of discrimination can file a charge of discrimination with the EEOC (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, n.d.).

In addition to legal protections, there are also a number of best practices that employers should follow in order to create a workplace that is free from discrimination and harassment. These best practices include developing and implementing policies and procedures prohibiting discrimination and harassment, providing training on these policies and procedures to all employees, and investigating and promptly addressing any complaints of discrimination or harassment (American Bar Association, 2016).

4. Research findings

Based on our review of the literature, we recommend that Ms. Jones take the following actions:

1. File a charge of discrimination with the EEOC.

2. Request a meeting with her supervisor to discuss the situation and request that they take action to address the discrimination she is facing.
3. If her supervisor does not take action to address the discrimination, consider filing a grievance with her union (if she is a member of one).
4. If she is not a member of a union, consider seeking advice from an attorney to discuss her legal options.

5. Recommendations for further research

This report has provided recommendations for Ms. Jones based on our review of the relevant literature. However, there is always room for further research on this topic. We recommend that future research be conducted on the following topics:

1. The effectiveness of different conflict resolution strategies in the workplace

2. The impact of employer-employee conflict on organizational productivity

3. The legal implications of employer-employee conflict in the United States

4 reasons why employers should proactively address employee conflict in the workplace.

6. Conclusion

In conclusion, Ms. Jones should take action to address the discrimination she is facing at her workplace. We recommend that she file a charge of discrimination with the EEOC and request a meeting with her supervisor to discuss the situation. If her supervisor does not take action to address the discrimination, she should consider filing a grievance with her union or seeking advice from an attorney.

FAQ

The main arguments for employee rights are that they protect workers from exploitation and help to ensure fair treatment in the workplace. The main arguments against employee rights are that they can lead to excessive regulation of businesses and may interfere with an employer’s ability to run their business as they see fit.

Countries approach employee rights differently depending on their legal system, economic development, and cultural values. In general, developed countries tend to have more comprehensive laws protecting employee rights than developing countries.

The XYZ company implemented employee rights by giving employees the right to unionize, providing paid vacation days, and ensuring equal pay for equal work regardless of gender. The company failed to implement employee rights by not providing health insurance or retirement benefits.